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Wednesday, May 11
 

11:00am

Registration Opens
Wednesday May 11, 2016 11:00am - 4:00pm
Coor Breezeway

12:00pm

Scholars Unconference
In advance of HASTAC 2015 there will be an afternoon Unconference for HASTAC Scholars.
This will be a time for HASTAC scholars, both past and present, to come together and network, build relations, and form collaborative ties for future research and impact.

Wednesday May 11, 2016 12:00pm - 4:00pm
COOR L1-10
  • Session Location TBA

4:00pm

Steering Committee
Wednesday May 11, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Nexus Lab, COOR 5519 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location Nexus Lab, COOR 5519

6:00pm

Opening Remarks/Reception
As light hors d'oeuvres will be provided, please RSVP for Reception at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1guL8MrYqs8_6dpKlqvhKIsM1vQIMePFPSCvXQc0A3NI/viewform
 
 

Speakers

Wednesday May 11, 2016 6:00pm - 7:00pm
BAC 116 400 E. Lemon St. Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location BAC 116
 
Thursday, May 12
 

8:00am

Continental Breakfast
Join us and start your morning by enjoying complimentary breakfast in COOR Breezway. 

Thursday May 12, 2016 8:00am - 9:30am
COOR 976 S Forest Mall, Tempe, AZ 85281

8:00am

Conference Registration
Thursday May 12, 2016 8:00am - 5:00pm
COOR 976 S Forest Mall, Tempe, AZ 85281

9:00am

Keynote: Gary Dirks, "Solutions, scale, and sustainability: how humanities, arts, and social science can determine the future of well being"
Dr. Dirks is director of the Global Institute of Sustainability and director of LightWorks, an Arizona State University initiative that capitalizes on ASU's strengths in solar energy and other light-inspired research. He is also the Julie Wrigley Chair of Sustainable Practices and a professor of practice in the School of Sustainability and former member of the Board of Trustees for Sustainabiity @ ASU. Before joining ASU, Dirks was the president of BP Asia-Pacific and the president of BP China. In China, he grew BP from an operation with fewer than 30 employees and no revenue to more than 1,300 employees and revenues of about $4 billion in 2008. Dirks received a Ph.D. in chemistry from ASU in 1980. He was the first doctoral student to work in the Center for the Study of Early Events in Photosynthesis (now the Center for Bioenergy and Photosynthesis).

Speakers
PM

President Michael Crow

Michael M. Crow became the 16th president of Arizona State University on July 1, 2002. He is guiding the transformation of ASU into one of the nation’s leading public metropolitan research universities, an institution that combines the highest levels of academic excellence, inclusiveness to a broad demographic, and maximum societal impact—a model he terms the “New American University.” Under his direction the university pursues... Read More →


Thursday May 12, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
COOR 170 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 170

10:15am

Coffee Service
Fresh coffee will be available in the COOR breezeway.

Thursday May 12, 2016 10:15am - 11:00am
COOR 976 S Forest Mall, Tempe, AZ 85281

10:30am

Achives Alive: Activating the North Carolina Jukebox
The North Carolina Jukebox project transforms an inaccessible audio archive of historic North Carolina folk music into a vital, publicly accessible digital archive and museum exhibition. In the 1930s Frank Clyde Brown, a Duke scholar, began recording and archiving Western North Carolina folk music. Most of those recordings are still housed on wax cylinders and glass disks in the Duke Libraries, but about 400 songs have been converted to digital formats. Scholars in music and folklore, librarians, students, digital media specialists, descendants of the original performers, and contemporary musicians are working together to bring the collection to life.

As a digital cultural heritage project, NC jukebox provokes critical questions around authority, appropriation, and control of cultural artifacts preserved in wax and glass. At the same time, it opens up a possibility-space for ongoing academic and community collaboration around a living set of traditions and practices. The project includes an exhibition and online playlist of the “Greatest Hits” of the FCB collection. It also necessitates metadata standards and library infrastructure. We are exhibiting both in the Mountain Music Museum, operated by folk singer/musicians Terry and Ruth McKinney, and in the Rubenstein Library at Duke in time for the annual meeting of the Music Librarians Association.

In addition to foregrounding the music itself, NC Jukebox explores biographies of the singers, transcribe the songs, and traces the Scotch-English history and contemporary analogues of the songs themselves. We demonstrate change over time and space through maps, patterns, flows, timelines, and networks of the music – a kind of distant listening, or viewing. Interactive touchscreens, period photos, and hybrid analog-digital audio playback machines – a radio, a Jukebox, and perhaps a 78-playing phonograph – will invoke the historical conditions of production and reception. We also confront the history and limits of the songcatching enterprise itself. Brown’s posthumous editors left out African American singers and songs, among others, leading us to consider together how to move from cultural heritage as univocal essence to polyphonic, multimodal assemblage.

Speakers


Thursday May 12, 2016 10:30am - 10:45am
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

10:30am

Migration, the Refugee crisis and Video Games for Change
The Mediterranean has become one of the deadliest border crossings of the world. While the refugees and asylum seekers migrate en masse and in dire circumstances, the global context of safety shifts in dramatic ways making the migrant crisis an issue that truly matters to contemporary lives of everyone along the way. This paper is a case study of a November 2015 game jam that took place in Istanbul within the context of amberPlatform arts and technology festival where developers and designers had 36 hours to create video games on the theme “göçüyoruz!” (means both “We are going down!” and “We are migrating.”). The participants had already attended a panel on Syrian refugee crisis in Turkey organized in conjuction with the game jam. The result was 6 video and 3 analogue games.

This paper is a case study of the process of creating this game jam –I curated both the panel and the game jam- where code writers and game developers look into a current event through the angle of empathy and political involvement. Can video games really change the world? Can we play with lives, so to speak? While games for social change is already a genre, the scope of this work involved listening to first person accounts from activists, lawyers and refugee artists about the larger questions at hand regarding the day to day lives of migrants, and the point of view of those who are living in bureaucratic limbo in Turkey.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 10:30am - 10:45am
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

10:30am

Complex Systems in Digital Humanities: Corpus Linguistics and Variation
As I have shown (Kretzschmar 2009, 2015), the basic elements of speech--i.e., language in use, what people actually say and write to and for each other-- correspond to what has been called a “complex system” in sciences ranging from physics to ecology to economics. I will introduce the principles of complexity science in a non-technical way, and then apply properties of complexity to corpus linguistics and language varieties. In corpus linguistics, complex systems tells us, through its property of nonlinear distributions, how to manage the traditional issue of balancing the need to find just the right documents (precision) vs. finding all the relevant documents (recall). Complexity theory also suggests how we can find the particular aspects of language that differentiate the writing of one author from another, say in a study of a corpus made from the works of one author in comparison with a corpus of writings by other people from the same period. Thus, we can apply the linguistics of speech to problems we need to address, and thereby do a better job of using digital means to understanding the language variation around us.

Reference

Kretzschmar, William A., Jr. 2009. The Linguistics of Speech. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Kretzschmar, William A., Jr. 2015. Language and Complex Systems. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 10:30am - 10:45am
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

10:30am

Networking the Canon: The Representation of Canonicity through Amazon and the Heath Anthology
My short presentation explores the reception and re-configuration of the literary canon as it pertains to women and marginalized writers. I explore how online stores, like Amazon, organize literature through market-driven algorithms that partition women and minority writers from canonical works by male writers. Taking the Heath Anthology of American Literature as a point of departure, I will explore how its organizational logic built around selecting well known and lesser-known writers contrasts with Amazon’s market-based recommendation engine. How literary anthologies and online bookstores associate texts with others produces literary value. This presentation contrasts the logic of the link, built on technologies, philosophies, and ideologies of “inclusion” and “association,” with the organizational structure of the Heath. How does the Internet-era practice of linking impact the logic of cultural inclusion and exclusion? I focus on the central question: what is the impact of the differing organizational structures and content of literature in the Heath Anthology and Amazon? How does the logic of the marketplace of goods and values, so central to Amazon’s organization, influence how books are organized? While the importance of reading multicultural literature remains the same today as in the 1970s, when civil rights spurred conversations on the inclusion of writers of color in the canon, the significance of how algorithms impact the visibility and distribution of literature for many cultural consumers to comment on and critique reinvigorates debates on canonicity for the twenty-first century scholar. My research exposes how Amazon’s pernicious, market-based algorithms determine what future users buy, partition women from the literary canon, and establish what counts as humanistic discourse for the broader public.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 10:30am - 10:45am
COOR 186 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 186

10:30am

Interdisciplinary Configurations of the Digital
Interdisciplinarity (ID) is often associated with pathbreaking developments, and digital work is no exception. This paper distinguishes interdisciplinary configurations in digital research and education. Methodological ID typically improves the quality of results by using a method, concept, or tool from another discipline in order to test a hypothesis or address a particular research question or problem. In contrast, Theoretical ID develops a more comprehensive general view, typically in the form of new conceptual frameworks or syntheses. Digital work is widely viewed as methodological in nature because of close association with tools and methods. Yet, the current discourse of Making is developing a new epistemology of building that dismantles the dichotomy of “making” and “thinking.” In further contrast, Instrumental ID typically focuses on creating a product or meeting a designated pragmatic need, whereas Critical ID interrogates the dominant structure of knowledge and education with the aim of transforming while raising questions of value and purpose silent in instrumental discourse. Critical ID is heightened in studies of race and gender in initiatives such as #transformDH and Postcolonial Digital Humanities as well as cultural critique of new technologies and media. The question of interdisciplinary work practice follows. Anne Balsamo’s concept of “interdisciplinary shift work” provides a helpful framework. Unlike shifts that begin and end by punching a clock, interdisciplinary shift work entails on-going travel across boundaries in academic institutions and beyond in new platforms of cultural reproduction, virtual environments, networked social spaces, and mobile access points. The “digital,” as a result, is simultaneously horizontal and vertical. It is located within local domains of disciplines, interdisciplinary fields, and professions. At the same individual practices cross-sect, with multiplicative impacts across the interdisciplinary “circuit” of digital work.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 10:30am - 10:45am
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281

10:45am

A Social History of Water Rights: Digitizing the Los Angeles Aqueduct

The Los Angeles Aqueduct is central to understanding the history of modern Los Angeles and battles over water scarcity in the region. Dating back to its construction in 1913, the aqueduct has been both a source of controversy and an engine for population growth in Los Angeles. The aqueduct’s history is rife with questions over political power, water rights, Native American sovereignty, and environmental degradation. From 2013-2015, the UCLA Library and Metabolic Studio aimed to capture the complexity of the aqueduct’s history with the creation of the Los Angeles Aqueduct Digital Platform (LAADP). Designed as both an archive and a source of scholarship, the website houses over 2,000 archival materials that have been digitized and a scholarship section that hosts dozens of contributions from UCLA students.

This paper will be centered on the platform’s capstone project. I was hired to work with a team of undergraduate students to produce a series of original pieces for the scholarship section using digital humanities tools. We decided to focus on groups that have been adversely affected by the aqueduct’s construction and produce a social history of the aqueduct. The five pieces we produced looked at a variety of issues ranging from the history of Paiute natives in the region to contemporary concerns over dust pollution in the Owens Valley. Using long-form narrative, GIS, data visualizations, and a host of other tools, we were able to creatively reimagine various facets of the aqueduct’s history. Building on previous works of digital history, this project looked to situate the aqueduct as an evolving, contested space that has been reinterpreted by different generations of Californians. I will argue that the LAADP serves as a model for producing digital history projects that address a multifaceted topic while also fostering student research on issues of both contemporary and historical importance.


Speakers


Thursday May 12, 2016 10:45am - 11:00am
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

10:45am

Speculative Practices as Critical Making: Designing Rituals, Situations, and other Tangible Imaginaries
While both Critical Making (Ratto 2011) and Design Fiction (Bleecker 2009) are techniques that provoke speculation about practices, such psychological “effects” are often treated as epiphenomena of the design object rather than as structured experiences which themselves might be available for creative manipulation. But as scholars from ritual studies will tell us, humans have a long history of designing rituals (Bell 1992; Grimes 1995, Tambiah 1981, Hobsbawm 1992), and we can similarly understand a range of communication practices as the outcome of designerly intervention, including: Roberts Rules of Order, feminist Consciousness Raising conversation groups, AA meetings, couples counseling, and Occupy Human Mic rituals. Indeed, some of the most significant cultural transformations in human history have involved the invention, or creative reimagining, of rituals, situations, and routines. This talk approaches the mechanics of human practice itself as a topic of Critical Making, not only through explicit decisions about material interfaces but also through speculative manipulation of tacit rules of engagement—thus, expanding the notion of “making” to treat the mechanics of practice as if it were a kind of material structure. Rituals, routines, situations, encounters, etc. are all embodied, procedurally structured, and spatiotemporally bound performances. In their prospective or prototype form, I call these phenomena ‘tangible imaginaries’ as a nod to their dual status as both embodied experience and imagination space. Tangible imaginaries recast Goffman’s notion of the interaction-ritual (1967) through the lens of Butler’s conception of the “doer… constructed in and through the deed” (1990) and open up the implicit mechanics of “deeds” (encounters with social-action) as if they were available for critical redesign. This approach adapts the methodology of Critical Making by drawing from a variety of techniques, including: Ronald Grimes’s Ritual Lab pedagogy (1995), the breaching experiments of ethnomethodology (Garfinkel 1967), Lawrence Halprin’s RSVP cycles (1970), as well as design methods of bodystorming (Oulasvirta et al. 2003) and experience prototyping (Buchenau & Suri 2000).


Thursday May 12, 2016 10:45am - 11:00am
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

10:45am

The Corpus of Revenge Tragedy (CoRT): Toward Interdisciplining Early Modern Genre Analysis
Digital Humanities (DH) enhances early modern English dramatic studies through its capacity to complement existing modes of literary analysis and disrupt practices of interpretation and knowledge construction. Additionally, within the work of genre analysis, DH can provocatively explore a genre’s discursivity and its position as a cultural phenomenon. In the continued study of early modern revenge tragedy—a genre that has received relatively little attention in comparison to others—DH invaluably demonstrates this genre’s increasing participation in discourses of medicine and anatomy by tracing the movement of anatomical language from the medical register to a dramatic one. This project reports on a corpus linguistics genre analysis of early modern revenge tragedy and widens the scope of inquiry about the roles of the body and anatomical language in revenge tragedy. I created the Corpus of Revenge Tragedy (CoRT) as an experimental corpus of 40 revenge tragedies to compare against Shakespeare’s corpus, the Early Modern English Medical Texts Corpus (EMEMT), the Corpus of English Dialogues (CED), and the EEBO-TCP database of more than 25,000 texts. To map increasing frequencies of anatomical and medical vernacular in this genre, AntConc was used to compare these corpora. To focus interpretation, I collated—through traditional concordance-making methods—an Anatomical Lexicon (AL) of representative material and metaphorical words from revenge tragedies. Using my AL to compare word frequencies in the experimental CoRT against the control corpora, I demonstrate and depict—through data visualization and geospatial mapping—the lexical comparability between revenge tragedies and contemporary medical texts. Such an examination of how revenge tragedies adopted and exploited the medical register is significant to understanding not only the cultural significance of the revenge tragedy genre but also early modern conceptions of embodiment and the pervasiveness of the contemporary medical arena in popular culture.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 10:45am - 11:00am
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

10:45am

Relocating Addiction: A Digital Method for Examining the Expression of an Ongoing Heroin Epidemic
Between 2012 and June, 2015, Florida’s Manatee, Sarasota, and Desoto counties have witnessed a 137.5% increase in heroin deaths. The increase has cost the three counties thousands of dollars and has left family and community members in emotional pain. Clearly the epidemic calls for an intervention. However, current disciplinary solutions have been unable to offer a holistic treatment for this problem. For example, the Florida legislation continues to search for the correct way to punish drug users, the medical community continues to test the drug users’ brains to medicalize the problem, and mental health professionals continue to label drug users as insane. These methods can be problematic because disciplinary perspectives tend to place the problem within the individual drug user: addiction is considered a personal and not a public problem without considering external factors. Therefore, I argue we need to invent a research method that relocates drug use to environmental causes. I question, what conditions must be present for drug addiction to emerge as an epidemic and how does the built environment allow for addiction to express itself? In this project then, I report on an online timeline I created that digitally expresses one day in Manatee County. The one day timeline hosts recordings from a psychogeography performed in Manatee County (which included notes, photographs, and sound recordings), recordings of all police dispatches for that same day, and YouTube videos created within the county on that same day. To filter the media in the timeline, I used Greg Ulmer’s electracy methods to uncover a dialectical image which ties together the personal, environmental and social spheres to act as a lens for consulting on the heroin epidemic. I will report on this lens and how it may be helpful for offering a solution to the heroin epidemic in the counties.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 10:45am - 11:00am
COOR 186 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 186

10:45am

Democratizing Learning: Online Community and the Negotiated Syllabus in the Interdisciplinary Upper-Level General Education Classroom
This paper explores the benefits of framing the constructivist educational environment by developing an upper-level general education course where course content is negotiated and constructed by class participants. High impact learning practices used to involve students in the design of the course included: a negotiated syllabus, where students were involved in choosing the readings for various weeks; active journaling exercises where students engaged in different modes of learning to explore course concepts; formative assessment by collecting information on troublesome concepts at the end of each class session; online discussion as a community building tool outside of class time; and offering students different options for major course assignments. The paper concludes with the challenges and opportunities in designing and delivering a constructivist, highly negotiated course, as well as a review of the collected responses of students perception of the class experience.


Thursday May 12, 2016 10:45am - 11:00am
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

11:00am

Digital East St. Louis
This presentation will share work underway with Digital East St. Louis, a project funded by a National Science Foundation Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers grant. Housed at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, the project is a collaboration between the Science Technology and Math Center, the Interdisciplinary Research and Scholarship Center (SIUE’s digital humanities Center), and the East St. Louis Community. Faculty in English and History who specialize in the digital humanities work alongside middle school teachers in the East St. Louis school district to develop a comprehensive three-year summer and after-school program for a group of middle school students. The research component of Digital East St. Louis is assessing how a digital humanities, place-based approach inspires student interest in the computer sciences. Over the three-year program, which launched in the summer of 2015, students will build a comprehensive database and a content-rich digital map showcasing their research into the history and culture of the city and its inhabitants.

One of the project’s primary goals is to encourage students to think across disciplines about ecology, geography, the lived environment, history, literature, and culture. Students will use skills central to information technology and information literacy to draw linkages between these topics, which will expand their critical thinking abilities and encourage them to see technology as a tool for exploring and visualizing broader questions. The project plans to train students in photography as they learn about East St. Louis architecture, learn about video production as they conduct oral history interviews with East St. Louis residents, and develop skills in research and metadata as they develop their own research interests for the project. This presentation will highlight the projects’ progress and discuss how to develop successful collaborations between the fields of STEM and the digital humanities in informal K-12 learning environments.



Thursday May 12, 2016 11:00am - 11:15am
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

11:00am

Critical (of) Games in an Art School Context, a Narrative Case Study
Critical (of) Games is a new co-taught course launched in the Fall of 2015. Course material is designed to address cultural issues in art and games, while enabling students with a range of fundamental technical skills for designing and developing their own projects. Conversations about gender, economics, and access are balanced with asset design and computer programming assignments.

[[culture]]
Video games are, by profit and reach, the most popular art form. There is growing hostility within video game communities toward games focused on topics or approaches other than entertainment, and our previous students' have been reluctant to share their games and interactive art work on the internet. Where do these art forms intersect with established art worlds and what impact do they have on social and political action? Interactivity and open narrative structures can be used critically and experimentally. This course investigates the lack of exploration in the video game industry and covers instances of and culture around more critical games.

[[technical]]
We are in the middle of the first semester of this two course sequence. This first course prepares students for developing games, studying narrative, character, environment, 3D animation, coding, and distribution. In the Spring course, Students will form teams that collaboratively design, develop and release a game with a decidedly social or political focus.

[[outcome]]
We will present the course structure and outcomes as a narrative case-study on the potential subversion/engagement that can be developed by offering art and design students agency with new media tools and an atmosphere that supports critical discussion of tools, approaches and culture around video games. We will also present student projects from the two semesters.


Thursday May 12, 2016 11:00am - 11:15am
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

11:00am

Darwin's Semantic Voyage
Search in an environment with an uncertain distribution of resources involves a trade-off between local exploitation and distant exploration. This extends to the problem of information foraging, where a knowledge-seeker shifts between reading in depth and studying new domains. To study this, we examine the reading choices made by one of the most celebrated scientists of the modern era: Charles Darwin. Darwin built his theory of natural selection in part by synthesizing disparate parts of Victorian science. When we analyze his extensively self-documented reading, we find he does not follow a pattern of surprise-minimization. Rather, he shifts between phases in which he either remains with familiar topics or seeks cognitive surprise in novel fields. On the longest timescales, these shifts correlate with major intellectual epochs of his career, as detected by Bayesian epoch estimation. When we compare Darwin's reading path with publication order of the same texts, we find Darwin more adventurous than the culture as a whole. These results provide novel quantitative evidence for historical hypotheses previously debated only qualitatively.


Thursday May 12, 2016 11:00am - 11:15am
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

11:00am

Building the Comic Book Readership Archive
The Comic Book Readership Archive project, or CoBRA, is a digital archive serving to document American comic book readership and fandom. Comics scholarship is an established area of academic research and the subject of thousands of dissertations, journal articles, book chapters, monographs, and digital projects. While comics readership has been a specific target of scholarly attention, previous studies have not fully considered the vast documentary record of comic book readership that will be compiled and analyzed by the CoBRA project.

Throughout 2015, Dr. John Walsh and I at Indiana University, along with colleagues Carol Tilley and Kathryn La Barre at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, created the CoBRA foundational archive. We have also begun collecting data from primary source material, and related sets, to record fan participation such as: fan mail, fan club publications and membership rolls, contests sponsored by publishers and fan clubs, fanzines, and programs and attendee records from comic book conventions and similar events.

To date, we have generated over 6,000 fan and fan mail records from ten comic book publications between 1961 and 1973: The Fantastic Four, The X-Men, Tales of Suspense, Tales to Astonish, The Amazing Spider-Man, Captain America, Daredevil, Strange Tales, Conan the Barbarian, and The Incredible Hulk. By January, we anticipate doubling the number of records in the current data set.

My presentation will provide a detailed overview of the project team’s archive development process and progress to date. I will also discuss future development plans, in addition to ways that CoBRA will prompt new research questions and enable multiple forms of digital scholarship, including computationally-assisted content and data analysis, plus interactive maps, timelines, and other visualizations to help researchers study readership networks and activities.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 11:00am - 11:15am
COOR 186 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 186

11:00am

Choose-Your-Own-Grade: Instructional Civil Disobedience
Grades, though ubiquitous, obstruct learning. Common methods for calculating and assigning grades violate basic principles of statistics and educational measurement. Well-established findings in motivational, cognitive, and positive psychology support the argument that grades should not be used. Educational philosophers have demonstrated the inherent structural unfairness of the grade point average (GPA). Yet, despite the lack of any solid grounding in any discipline, grades remain an entrenched feature of the global educational landscape. This paper describes a pedagogical approach, bordering on civil disobedience, called “choose-your-own-grade.” In this approach, students are allowed to select any grade they would like for a course without any prerequisites or conditions. While significant positional authority is retained by the instructor, a great deal of power is abdicated to students. The nature, content and quality of discourse between student and instructor changes dramatically, tending to gravitate more toward substantive, though increasingly diverse, explorations of course content, and away from the superficial. Fundamental issues regarding the form and purpose of education are both revealed and clarified, both at the individual and macro levels. The conflicts of interest inherent in our current educational culture manifest themselves when students struggling with motivation and persistence begin to reveal the complex, multifaceted pressures that pit them against their peers and instructors. While the overall level of student performance remains relatively consistent with more traditional approaches, variability increases. Subtle differences in how the experience is structured result in differing levels of student satisfaction. Ultimately, however, the choose-your-own-grade approach faces significant, and perhaps insurmountable, impediments to effectiveness within the context of modern educational institutions. Representative stories from six years of exploration of this pedagogy illustrate some of the benefits, successes, challenges, and failures of this approach.


Thursday May 12, 2016 11:00am - 11:15am
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

11:00am

Lunch Buffet
Come to the COOR breezeway between 11AM-1PM to enjoy a complimentary lunch buffet. 

Thursday May 12, 2016 11:00am - 1:00pm
COOR 976 S Forest Mall, Tempe, AZ 85281

11:15am

Innovation in Museum Making: The Museum of Fictional Literary Artifacts
Fictional objects, like characters, linger with readers in ways similar to material ones. Marketers recognize the pull of these objects, offering physical versions such as the necklace worn by Rose in Titanic or the light-sabres whipped around by characters in Star Wars. What became of the piano in D.H. Lawrence’s poem? The portrait of Dorian Gray? Dracula’s wooden stake? Our museum collects these objects and represents them with photos, explanatory notes, context, and provenance. Where was the object originally, and how did we get it?

The objects chosen to serve in a fictional work are remarkable. Material objects, and the effort to control them, own them, manipulate them, and leave them behind, help to catapult plots and develop characters. The novel Huckleberry Finn, for example, leaves behind a boot with a crossed heel, a bloody saw dabbed with hair, a hairball, a girl’s dress, and a bullet on a string. Just to name a few. Imagine the collection of girl’s dresses that might appear in a museum of this type. Or the knives, daggers, axes, spears, and penknives that sit side by side for comparison.

John Nelson, Professor of English for New Media, and Stacey Berry, Associate Professor of English for New Media will discuss The Museum of Fictional Literary Artifacts (http://mfla.omeka.net/), a digital thematic research collection they are currently developing at Dakota State University. The site provides students and scholars, in any level or field, the humanistic and technological experience in writing, collecting, editing and thinking critically about material artifacts in fictional (and real) worlds. Gathering hundreds of fictional items--from diverse works and from many periods and genres into one searchable database--allows us to consider these fictional artifacts--and their sources--in entirely new ways.


Thursday May 12, 2016 11:15am - 11:30am
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

11:15am

Critical and Collaborative Digital Ethnography: Studying Social Surveillance and the Marginalization of Black Girls on YouTube
This paper examines the social surveillance of watching tween black girls "messing around" while twerking on YouTube. The purpose is to unveil its unintended consequences on marginalized youth in new media ecologies. The paper will meet this aim by: (1) exploring the phenomenon of black girls’ twerking in the YouTube archive; (2) explaining how twerking as bedroom vlogging is read (or misread) by unintended audiences; and (3) discussing the implications of social surveillance for marginalized girls in YouTube's specific new media ecology. 

In 2013 I stumbled upon this adventure in marginalized tweens' online sexuality and play. Ironically it was also International Women's Day. Rapper/pop star Nicki Minaj was featured in a new music video titled "Freaks" by male rapper French Montana. In less than 24 hours, the video went viral with over 1 million views and the top demographic among those views were females 13-17 or 18-24. The partial nudity of Minaj's possibly surgically-enhanced breasts surely keyed young girls' attention towards her privileged celebrity status and persona as a "bad bitch”—doing whatever she wants and owning it. I wondered how little black girls were mirroring the squatting and popping of her ass towards the camera as Minaj was ”seated" with her back to the audience on a lavish gold throne chair. The image was fitting. Minaj is one of wealthiest and most powerful emcees of all time, especially among women. 

With the help of over 100 students in various sections of an introduction to cultural anthropology course and a few anthropological analysis capstone courses, we watched and coded over 600 videos of tween and teen black girls twerking in the blurred privacy of a bedroom or other living spaces in their homes. Their millennial eyes and interpretations offered new insights that my baby-boomer eyes could not see. I discuss the implications for ethnography as a form of “compassion studies” for marginalized groups online. 

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 11:15am - 11:30am
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281

11:15am

Delving into Google DeepMind: Using Rhetorical Analysis as an Approach to Algorithmic Literacy
Ted Striphas is researching “algorithmic culture,” by which he means “the use of computers and complex mathematical routines to sort, classify, and create hierarchies for our many forms of human expression and association” (Striphas, 2011). He uses the term “algorithmic literacies” to describe a critical approach to, and recognition of, the activities and consequences of algorithmic activity. Cathy Davidson calls for a 4th “R” of literacy — beyond reading, writing, and arithmetic — to be algorithms. Because algorithms are “as basic to the way the 21st century digital age works as reading, writing, and arithmetic were to the late 18th century Industrial era” (Davidson, 2011), she maintains that literacy in algorithms should become a focus of school literacy efforts.

As the call for algorithmic literacy spreads, the question for digital scholars in the humanities and social sciences is clear: What does it mean to be literate in algorithms? Beyond a study of obvious effects of algorithms (like online ads that “follow” our browsing and purchasing habits) and less visible effects (like customized online search results based on network IP address and geolocation), can we develop a critical approach to the very language of algorithms, the code that enacts algorithmic activity? This paper proposes algorithmic literacy as a potential configuration of technological and humanistic domains by introducing a rhetorical approach to an artificial intelligence algorithm developed by Google DeepMind. The paper seeks to apply traditional and nontraditional rhetorical analysis strategies to the algorithm as textual representation toward developing methods for understanding the persuasive nature of algorithms as composed texts.

Davidson, C. (2011, October 31). What are the 4 R’s essential to 21st century learning? [Blog post]. HASTAC. Retrieved November 16, 2015, from https://www.hastac.org/blogs/
cathy-davidson/2011/10/31/what-are-4-rs-essential-21st-century-learning

Striphas, T. (2011, October 17). Algorithmic literacies [Blog post]. The late age of print: Beyond the book. Retrieved November 15, 2015, from http://www.thelateageofprint.org/2011/10/17/algorithmic-literacies

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 11:15am - 11:30am
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

11:15am

New Materialism Meets Fabrication: A Methodology for Media History
This talk outlines a methodology for combining media studies with rapid prototyping and computer numerical control (CNC) techniques premised on remaking technologies that no longer function, no longer exist, or may have only existed as illustrations, fictions, or one-offs. Called “prototyping the past,” the methodology understands technologies as entanglements of culture, materials, and design, and it explains how and why technologies matter by approaching them as both representations and agents of history. Informed by Anne Balsamo's notion of hermeneutic reverse engineering (2011), it refuses to take historical materials at face value. It situates media history in a particular thing and the contradictory interpretations that thing affords. It also relies upon trial-and-error negotiation across modes of 2-D and 3-D production, creating media that function simultaneously as evidence and arguments for interpreting the past. Yet most important, prototyping the past does more than re-contextualize media history in the present. It integrates that history into the social, cultural, and ethical trajectories of design. To demonstrate the methodology, we detail how the “Kits for Cultural History” project at the University of Victoria prototypes absences in the historical record and prompts audiences to examine the conditions of that record. We then dedicate our attention to one Kit in particular: the “Early Wearables Kit,” which remakes an 1867 electro-mobile jewelry piece from Paris. After briefly interpreting the Early Wearables Kit from three different perspectives, we offer eight ways to understand prototyping and media history together, with a new materialist emphasis on how prototyping the past stresses the contingent relations between matter and meaning (Barad 2007). Ultimately, we show how new materialism may inform otherwise uncritical approaches to rapid prototyping, including popular techniques common across so-called "maker cultures." (For example material, see the attached PDF, which includes photographs of early wearable prototypes, a visualization of the design cycle for the Kits, and historical illustrations of the wearables.)


Thursday May 12, 2016 11:15am - 11:30am
COOR 186 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 186

11:15am

An E.P.I.C. Approach to Public Digital Humanities: Externally Collaborative, Project-Based, Interdisciplinary Curricula for Learning Local History
Over the last 250 years, the Boston neighborhood of Jamaica Plain has emerged as one of the city’s most vibrant and dynamic communities. This uniqueness stems not only from the area’s cultural and class diversity, but also from a built environment that exudes connections to grand themes in the region’s history, many of which continue to shape local identity. Thus, Jamaica Plain serves as an important site for the study of how community places are made through a nexus of history, contemporary culture, and local public engagement. This paper reveals the benefits of practicing public digital humanities through a studio course at Wentworth Institute of Technology (WIT) called Media, Culture, and Communications Studies (MCCS) and an institute-wide pedagogical initiative called E.P.I.C. Learning (Externally Collaborative, Project-Based, Interdisciplinary Curricula for Learning), which has led to a meaningful digital dialogue with Jamaica Plain’s history. In particular, the course has utilized open-source/access tools such as Omeka, WorldMap, and Annotation Studio to create interactive virtual exhibits chronicling the history of two Jamaica Plain landmarks: the James Michael Curley House (the home of legendary Boston mayor, James Michael Curley), and the Loring-Greenough House (the neighbourhood’s last colonial-era home). A further component of pedagogy and scholarship has been public engagement through collaborations with local community stakeholders (city councillors, volunteer docents, companies, etc.) who have recognized the value of digital storytelling for public outreach. Overall, WIT’s MCCS Studio classes have not only provided students with valuable digital skills that strengthen their historical literacy (and—arguably—prepare them for the digital workplace), but have also provided a conduit for reconnecting Jamaica Plain community members with their local history in meaningful digital ways.


Thursday May 12, 2016 11:15am - 11:30am
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

11:45am

Hacking the Academy: Hacktivism, Makerspaces, and DH
Makerspaces (a.k.a. hackerspaces, fablabs) are collaborative sites for experimentation, collaboration, and creativity. As experiential learning sites, makerspaces support the development of multiple literacies while also introducing students to the principles of design thinking. This interactive workshop will introduce the suite of tools selected for the Mobile DH Makerspace being developed at the University of Iowa School of Library and Information Science, including littleBits building kits and Arduino microcontrollers . These tools were purposefully selected for their mobility, accessibility, and affordability. Each of these factors makes it easy to implement and build devices in unconventional venues.

In this workshop, participants will build a “hacktivist” device. As concerns over internet privacy and security increase, educators have become more and more concerned with training students to think critically about their digital presence, particularly through internet activism. As Elizabeth Losh notes, “Outright electronic civil disobedience could be described as the most militant form of political resistance in the digital humanities and one that has become more visible in panels and professional associations in recent years.” Although many academics discuss the need for hacktivism, few offer models for doing so. Adopting this approach, participants in this interactive session will work in teams to explore the capabilities of these tools and develop a working prototype while exploring the pedagogical approaches to incorporating these tools and critical technological literacy into the DH classroom.

Together the littleBits and Arduino scaffold to develop users’ confidence in coding, building, project management, and digital literacy. Designed to foster critical engagement and activism in undergraduate and graduate classrooms, across campuses, and in communities, this workshop emphasizes the ways in which individuals can simply and effectively engage in civil disobedience through the use of digital tools.


Thursday May 12, 2016 11:45am - 12:45pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

11:45am

Speaking Styles, Sound Studies, and Pitch-Tracking: A Demonstration
What makes a poet, a performer, a politician, or a preacher compelling to listen to? When we describe a speaker as neutral, dramatic, or monotonous, one implied feature is intonation, the rise and fall of the voice, as well as pitch range. While the field of sound studies develops apace, voice recognition and voice profiling are used in surveillance and employee recruitment, and debates about “NPR voice” and “poet voice” proliferate on social media, quantitative analysis of the voice is still uncommon among humanist scholars concerned with the enormous audio archive of vocal recordings. Pitch-tracking is routinely employed in corpus linguistics—a term for the digital humanities in the U.K.—but its use is novel in sound studies and DH in the U.S. It has the potential to defamiliarize texts, as Tanya Clement has argued about other DH methods, opening them to new angles of scholarly inquiry.

This interactive demonstration of a new pitch-tracking tool will allow the audience to see, in real-time, visualizations of the pitch range and intonation patterns of short vocal recordings of poems and speech, in line graphs and figures. This tool derives from the audio analysis program ARLO (Adaptive Recognition with Layered Optimization), developed through the NEH-sponsored High Performance Sound Technologies for Access and Scholarship (HiPSTAS). ARLO rivals programs commonly used by linguists, such as Praat, which are difficult to learn and have trouble tracking pitch in longer recordings of poor audio quality—a characteristic of much of the audio archive. The simple user interface for the ARLO pitch-tracker is the result of my collaboration, on an ACLS Digital Innovations Fellowship in 2015-16, with phonetician Georgia Zellou, sound and media artist and designer Dave Cerf, and David Tcheng, a machine learning scientist and senior audio signal analyst for GoPro, formerly of the Illinois Informatics Institute. (A current version of the interface is attached; it may change somewhat by May.)

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 11:45am - 12:45pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

11:45am

Hello World Well Lost
Here, I show how examples and illustrations drawn from introductory CS textbooks frequently cast knowledge of code and programming techniques in essentializing and determinist idioms; how esoteric jargon and in-jokes often dominate these texts, excluding outsiders from the start; and, significantly, how the often tacit assumptions that underwrite the rationale for learning to code while working towards a degree in CS are difficult to reconcile with the rationale a humanist might have for learning code.

Formed in the late sixties at the behest of the American military and global corporations, and everywhere dominated by the strategic norms of the marketplace (“good code” is efficient, scalable, rigorously standardized), the work of computer science is visible everywhere, and computer programming and procedural literacy their de facto domain. I ask, "What if disciplines from across the university worked to see themselves and their methodologies represented in the programming languages their students learn, and in the texts that teach them?"

I then describe a number of interdisciplinary approaches I have adopted in teaching graduate students from the humanities to code. These include design-centered, user-centered approaches; an approach emphasizing the material history of computer art; an approach linking concepts in coding to issues in philosophy and theory; an approach that drew inspiration from Dada, and required students only build useless programs; an effort to reduce reliance on computer science terminology in favor of concepts and terms drawn from across the arts and humanities (drawing on the Classical philosophical concept of an ideal, immaterial precondition for the exististance of a thing, a “class” becomes an “arche”).

I believe this would make a keen workshop, with members of various disciplines helping to sketch the outline of a new computer language, which we'd then build (in a very simple fashion) in real time. But if you are interested in this at all, I defer to your judgment as to proper format.


Thursday May 12, 2016 11:45am - 12:45pm
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

11:45am

Maps and Models

Maps and Models I: Power

Mapping and modeling networks of power is the focus of this session. The papers present projects that examine discourses of belief and doubt, race and internment, empire and insurgency, the circulation of gossip, news and journalism, and affect and the built environment.

 

 

Presenters include:

 

1). Jacob Lassin

Discourses of Belief and Doubt: Topic Modeling a Russian Orthodox Magazine

 

I will topic model the website of the Russian Orthodox magazine Foma which is billed as a "magazine for doubters." It is a magazine that is geared towards a sort of Orthodox "educated elite" or new Orthodox intelligentsia. I believe that topic modeling will provide me with a better sense of the sorts of discourses that are present in this journal with regards to Russian politics, history and its cultural heritage as a means of better understanding the concerns and foci of this Orthodox "educated elite." This method allows me to cover far more ground I would be able to do just reading on my own. To accomplish this I will use web scraping to be able to process the articles as plain text and be able to run them through Mallet and new packages developed by Ted Underwood. With this project I will address similar issues as other members of the panel who are also concerned with textual analysis as we discuss approaches of extracting and cleaning data, theoretical questions about what topic modeling can actually teach us and how to move from Mallet to a website where information can be accessed and explored in greater depth in each topic.

 

2). Courtney Sato

Curating Japanese American Internment and “Negative Cultural Heritage” Online

 

The WWII internment of Japanese Americans continues to reverberate in contemporary American life. Recent incidents suggest that Japanese American internment remains a little-understood historical footnote. At present there is no cohesive online platform for understanding this history, a void this project seeks to fill.  This project combines digital methodologies for curating and delivering content with the aims of serving a broader public beyond the university. In rendering certain archival materials accessible through this website, this project seeks to reexamine the ways we are taught to read or interact with university archives and library collections—especially those dealing with “negative cultural history” like internment. This project asks: how might one navigate such collections in new and diverse ways that extend beyond the conventional finding aid and individual “box” of materials one encounters in the reading room? What circuits have these objects traversed to end up in a university archive? What are the questions of copyright and ethics at stake in the collection of sensitive, “cultural heritage” materials like those featured in Yale University’s internment collections? How might a digital platform allow users to interact with the collections through mapping, the overlay of metadata, or topic model to ask novel questions?

 

3). Gavriel Cutipa-Zorn

Charting a Global Atlas of Model Villages and Counterinsurgency

 

In 1982, Israeli advisors trained the Guatemalan military to build model villages throughout the countryside as a method of “soft” counterinsurgency. Advisors invoked the success of the British army in suppressing the 1885 Burmese War. I will map locations that colonial progenitors of the model village describe within declassified documents, using a map-based interface. Moving from the American Occupation in the Philippines and Vietnam to Algeria and Burma, the project will create a digital library that includes primary and secondary source material linked to each country where models village was used. The project contributes, in both empirical and conceptual ways, to the increasing trend in scholarship to situate research on Israel/Palestine within a global context. This project facilitates and promotes empirical research on this question by building a centralized archive of hitherto scattered primary and secondary source documents. My approach opens an alternative conceptual framework on the conflict, one that opens up new avenues of thinking through Israel/Palestine on a global level. While dominant exceptionalist narratives of the conflict obscure influential forces taking place outside of its nation-state boundaries, the digital collection’s map-based interface will unveil the global networks and transnational matrices of power that are embedded in and critical to understanding the conflict.

 

4). Nick Frisch

The Evolution of Information History in Late Imperial and Early Modern China

 

I will be using digital methods to parse Notes from the Cottage of Subtle Perception (Yuewei Caotang Biji for short), a collection of approximately 1200 paragraph-long anecdotes, gossip, and observations recorded by Ji Yun (1724–1805), secretary and chief compiler of the Qianlong Emperor. It was highly unusual for a man in Ji Yun's position to produce these proto-journalistic writings, yet they circulated within his lifetime, beyond the coterie of educated men who traditionally constituted China's literary field. More unusual still, the anecdotes are rigorously sourced to contemporaneous figures, dated to or within precise years, linked to exact geographic locations, and laced with editorial comment about the credibility of informants and potential accuracy of the stories. It is divided into five sections which were completed and circulated at various points through Ji's life before final compilation into the Yuewei collection.

 

Using named entity recognition and network analysis, I will create visualizations that map this text's references across the spatial geography of the Qing empire, the social field of elite Qing literati, and through the decades of Ji Yun's career. This will provide an alternative means of both reading the text, and analyzing its significance (current scholarship views the work as a collection of ghost stories, which is a partial telling). In the process, I hope to develop a working model for parsing Chinese texts that circumvents the limitations of DH tools originally designed for European languages and epistemes, and will support my dissertation work.

 

5 & 6). Peter Racugglia and Andrew Brown

Infrastructures of Feeling: Literature, Affect, and the Built Environment in Seventeenth-Century London and Nineteenth-Century Philadelphia

 

This project will use GIS and spatial analysis technologies to examine how infrastructure produces and redirects flows not only of capital, energy, or material resources, but also of affects. Our aim is to visualize both the ways in which the built environments of seventeenth-century London and nineteenth-century Philadelphia were reshaped through large-scale infrastructural projects, and the ways in which literary works differentially encode affective attachments to these changing urban landscapes. Seventeenth-century London and nineteenth-century Philadelphia have each featured prominently in scholarly narratives of urban modernization: the former as the metropole of a colonial and mercantile empire then in its infancy, and the latter as a crucible for distinctly American forms of political debate and public discourse. Indeed, the early history of Philadelphia itself—founded in 1682 by the Quaker politician William Penn, partly in response to ongoing disputes over religious toleration in England—might be said to function as a kind of threshold from which these distinct media cultures can be examined simultaneously. By juxtaposing these two sites, moreover, the project will also attempt to trace broad conceptual shifts in the understanding of the category of “infrastructure” itself across the period, as authors, their publics, and the inhabitants of each city engaged with wide-ranging structural changes in their environment.

 

 

 

Maps and Models II: Aesthetics

This panel focuses on spatializations of aesthetic form through mapping, modeling and other techniques. Papers present projects that examine the economic value of nature, race, big data and social media, film festivals and their global circuits post 1932, reconstruction of the Paris Salon, and the work of Yayoi Kasuma.

 

 

Presenters include:

 

1). Alyssa Battistoni

Mapping Nature’s Value(s): Representing Nature Beyond Capital

 

“What’s your neighborhood worth”? This is the question asked by the David Suzuki Foundation’s “Putting Natural Capital on the Map” application, which aims to spatially represent the value of nature as measured by the growing field of natural capital economics. The foundation declares that “nature is, of course, priceless”—yet notes that this invocation of intrinsic value isn’t useful to developers and officials who are trying to decide whether and how to develop land. But what other kinds of value might we want to take into account in making such decisions? What are the potential effects of seeing nature as capital? And how might we represent nature's value otherwise?


My project layers different kinds of data atop maps of natural capital in an attempt to offer a richer representation of the value(s) of nature. In …


Thursday May 12, 2016 11:45am - 2:00pm
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

1:00pm

Reading Speech: Virginia Woolf, Machine Learning, and the Quotation Mark
This presentation offers preliminary findings and future plans for a text analysis project that examines Virginia Woolf’s irregular uses of quotation marks throughout her corpus as the moments in which her interests in heard sound, print text, and the politics of recording intersect. Most digital text analysis protocols treat punctuation marks as extraneous information, focusing on the vocabulary itself as the tokens of interest. My project explores just these often-overlooked markings as the most representative examples of the human voice in a text and, accordingly, deeply embedded in questions of power, politics, and what it means to be human. The preliminary findings show a sharp decrease in the proportions of text that Woolf devotes to quoted speech over her career, and I argue for an analogous stylistic shift in her work from more Victorianist prose to more modernist aesthetics. This general trajectory is accompanied by a shift away from interests in society and towards the individual, and I argue that this decline corresponds to a considerable increase in the amount of speech that Woolf does not flag with quotation marks, moments that closely mirror modernist experiments in narrated thought. By adapting machine learning and natural language processing techniques, the project trains the computer to identify speech-like moments where no quotation marks appear. Bringing such unpunctuated speech to the surface stands to reshape our understanding of Woolf’s writing practice as one as much centered on the radical inscription of sound as on a new aesthetics of the text.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 1:00pm - 1:15pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

1:00pm

Scholarly Communication and Collaboration Across Disciplinary Boundaries: Building Humanities Commons
With support from the Mellon Foundation, the Modern Language Association is in the midst of creating the Humanities Commons, a federated open-source network of sites that will link the MLA to other humanities societies to further interdisciplinary collaboration. During this pilot phase of the project, the MLA is establishing and connecting Commons networks for three partners, the College Art Association; the Association for Jewish Studies; and the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, and building a central hub for members of these societies to work together.

A key element of this project will be the expansion of the scholarly association's beta repository, CORE, which facilitates the open-access distribution, discussion, and citation of the many products of humanities research, including online exhibitions, conference presentations, data sets, and learning objects such as syllabi and slide decks. A truly social repository, CORE currently connects with the MLA's special interest forums, enabling members to share their deposited work directly with the people likely to be most interested in reading and discussing it. This connection has resulted in enhanced discoverability that has been crucial in encouraging uptake and continued use of the repository.

CORE will expanded across the network of Humanities Commons spokes, opening up opportunities for participation in scholarly communication regardless of discipline or institution. A robust tagging system will allow any visitor to the Humanities Commons to discover scholarship that transcends or lives between disciplines, while benefitting the members of the scholarly societies by increasing the discoverability and impact of the objects of their humanities research.

In May 2016, CORE will be a year old, while Humanities Commons will have six months remaining in its grant period. In this HASTAC paper, the CORE and Humanities Commons project manager will discuss what the MLA team has learned from the successes, failures, and challenges encountered along the path to building an interdisciplinary commons.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 1:00pm - 1:15pm
COOR 186 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 186

1:00pm

An Archive of One’s Own: The Radical Possibilities of the Digital Database
Advances in digitally networked technologies, combined with increasingly plentiful space for electronic storage have resulted in an expansion of opportunities for archiving cultural artifacts. The ability to create digital media and to digitize analogue media democratizes the role of the archivist and allows new opportunities for collaboration and, in so doing, highlights the underlying value systems that have informed digitization and preservation efforts to date. In place of a few official archives, copious personal and participatory archives have arisen, collections that are characterized by a more diverse content base, a realignment of knowledge objects, and a reimagining of the connections among and between them.

The clear delineation between data and metadata, for instance, is called into question with the recognition that context, in many ways, dictates meaning. So too the boundary of any single archive is increasingly in flux as each exists in a larger online network. Moreover the fixedness of a single artifact becomes destabilized as digital copies, failing to exhaust the original, result in potentially limitless replicas. In this media landscape then, discoverability is a key issue when considering archival practices. Do digital spaces merely amplify those voices that are already heard loudly and clearly? What sort of stewardship issues prevail in a network controlled by the private sector? And how might considering all such issues help us to reimagine other knowledge objects (the memoir, the monograph), as well as structures of knowledge (the edited anthology, the university-held collection) in order that their buried assumptions might be openly scrutinized and evaluated?

The four presentations (long papers) in this panel tackle such questions, using a current project to illuminate aspects of contemporary archives and archival practices in all of their rich diversity.

Speakers
avatar for Caitlin Fisher

Caitlin Fisher

Director, Augmented Reality Lab, York University
Caitlin directs the Augmented Reality Lab at York University where she held the Canada Research Chair in Digital Culture for the past decade. A 2013 Fulbright Chair, she is the recipient of many international awards for digital storytelling including the Electronic Literature Award for Fiction and the Vinaròs Prize for her AR poetry. Caitlin serves on the international Board of Directors for both the Electronic Literature Organization and... Read More →


Thursday May 12, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

1:00pm

Process over Process: Big Data Activism, Platform Détournement and Other Resurgent Feminist Network Methods
This session explores feminist network methods as process-heavy tactics to retool the big data, digital platforms, and market rationalities that structure current value metrics. We will take up some of the collaborative strategies developed to work with and against the proliferation and privatization of big data, the corporatization and standardization of platforms, and the individuation and precarity of the neoliberal university as resurgent methods of feminist collectivity, network-building and reordering network relations.

Nicole Brown will talk about methodological innovation describing research projects where she has used traditional sociological research methods alongside computational processes. In service to Black feminism, the design and aims of these innovative mixed methods approaches challenge the biases of both computational analysis and disciplinary constructions.

T.L. Cowan will discuss how feminist collaborative processes are rich sources of information, and will identify tools-based knowledges that are collectively gathered as a network organism. This discussion of collaborative processes includes the unlikely assemblage of cabaret performance, critical pedagogy, anti-violence feminist activism and mobile media.

Veronica Paredes will review how FemTechNet has collaboratively gained access and used online tools against objectives embedded in the platforms’ designs. FemTechNet demonstrates how feminist technoscience practices connect to radical pedagogies and histories, and forge alternative futures for online education.

Jasmine Rault will follow the traces of earlier forms of feminist educational networks, from Black, Chicana and “Third World Women” feminist pedagogy and research in Freedom Schools in the 1960s and collaborative public curricula in Boston through the Cambridge Women’s School (1972-1992), as well as accountability technologies like ‘consciousness raising’ and ‘checking-in,’ as they inform contemporary strategies for surviving the neoliberal market rationality of the US and Canadian university.

K.J. Surkan will trace the battle between advocates for the HBOC (hereditary breast and ovarian cancer) community and Myriad Genetics over BRCA data sharing. I argue for understanding the Free the Data movement as a form of anti-capitalist feminist health care hacking, predicated on the notion of open source data sharing as a form of genetic empowerment.


Thursday May 12, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

1:15pm

Countermapping Dangerous Geographies
As part of a research project entitled "Dangerous Geographies: The social abandonment of racialized women in South LA and Vancouver's Downtown Eastside", I am experimenting with different mapping software in order to counter some of the crime mapping trends in mass media web platforms (specifically, the LA Times' Homicide Report). 'Dangerous Geographies' analyzes the fact of and response to the murder of over 100 African-American women in South LA and 60 women (majority Indigenous) in Vancouver between 1987 and 2010). I analyze these cases mostly in terms of two things: 1. how they tell a story about city life and social abandonment - i.e. the withdrawal of social services and the increase in crime-seeking policing, the absence of addiction care, the criminalization of sex work - and 2. how they draw out public narratives of the disposability of Black and Indigenous women. At HASTAC 2016, I would like to talk about how countermapping practices - e.g. annotating crime maps with multimedia content, drawing out data that lays out structural obstacles to living a less threatened life - might push back against the way that crime mapping reinscribes a fatalistic collapse of blighted neighbourhoods and ruined women.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 1:15pm - 1:30pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

1:15pm

Literature and Social Online Learning: An Interdisciplinary, Project-Based Undergraduate Course at Stanford University
This talk discusses the conceptual framework, learning goals and outcomes of an innovative undergraduate class my husband Sebastian Thrun (Computer Science) and I (Comparative Literature) taught at Stanford University in the Fall of 2014. Designed as a project-based course with truly interdisciplinary student teams and professor team, the class challenged the students to innovate the ways in which literature and serious literary study could be shared and enhanced for a broader reading public using the internet and social media. Through design thinking, rapid iteration, and built-in interdisciplinary challenges, the student teams developed and launched six separate projects in a mere 10 weeks: (new apps, websites, new social media platforms ranging from collaborative fan fiction to new comparative literary translations, music tracks to accompany books, a philosophy app based on Tinder, satirical literary quizzes, virtual reality environments for poems, and a curated social reading list app enhancing the Goodreads platform. The class was part of a new joint major program at Stanford University, called "CS+X" (with CS standing for Computer Science, and X for various humanities departments that have signed on). By bringing together "techies" and "fuzzies" who do not usually take classes together or work on projects together as a team, this class achieved different things than a typical interdisciplinary program or major would: it enabled a direct conversation between, and more importantly, a true grappling with, the differences in mindset and approach that characterize Computer Science and literary study, respectively. When the maker spirit and the spirit of reflection meet each other and occasionally clash, new thinking can emerge that neither discipline alone would be able to produce, expanding what it can mean to teach an interdisciplinary class, including unexpected challenges and joys. 


Thursday May 12, 2016 1:15pm - 1:30pm
COOR 186 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 186

1:30pm

Modeling a National Media Conversation: Agent-based models, Sonification, and the case of “Mark Twain”
This paper uses agent-based models (ABMs) and sonification to investigate media coverage of “Mark Twain” as it has been preserved in a digital collection of historic 19th and early 20th century newspapers assembled as part of the Chronicling America Project at the Library of Congress. I argue that the combination of ABMs and sonification offers a somatic alternative to the reliance on visualization that characterizes much digital humanities work on textual corpora: this embodied perspective, part of a movement toward what has been called data "perceptualization," provides access to a greater array of sensory experiences a dataset may provoke and invites the creation of exploratory, experimental, experiential narratives that are no more or less defensible than narratives produced by more widespread approaches to data analysis.

I begin my discussion by outlining the creation of an AMB that invites users to adopt the perspective of an agent navigating a digital environment in which “Mark Twain” is a central topic of interest. I then demonstrate that occupying space within the model provides users an opportunity to experience the conversation surrounding “Mark Twain” as it unfolds in real-time; and, I show how sonification may be employed to enhance this experience by providing as sense of the sonic environment created by conversations as they unfold. I conclude by comparing insights obtained by visualizing my dataset with those produced by modeling the same data.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 1:30pm - 1:45pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

1:30pm

Literary GIS Methodology Versus Platforms: Technological Affordances and Their Discontents
This proposed talk will explore the convergence of literary GIS as a methodological approach and the use of platforms such as Neatline, a plugin for Omeka exhibits that allows the developer to tell spatial stories in time. With the proliferation of platforms such as Omeka and Neatline for large and small scale projects,I argue that it is incumbent upon digital humanists to critically reflect not only on the technological affordances of GIS as a methodical approach, but also the positivistic pursuit of mappable data which has been said to elide “hidden chronologies” or complex social spaces such as gendered domestic environments, spaces not easily charted with the use of points, lines, and polygons. In order to do so, I will drawn from my own experiences building the urban compliment to David Cooper and Ian Gregory’s “Mapping the Lakes” (MTL), which composes an interactive digital map that plots William Wordsworth’s walking route detailed in his autobiographical poem The Prelude, particularly Book Seven, “Residence in London.” Similar to the MTL project, the aim of Mapping Wordsworth’s Conspicuous Consumption (MWCC) is not simply to visualize placenames within a poem, but to “open up methodological and critical space for the ongoing development of literary GIS.” This will be the first project of its kind to trace (or essentially hypothesize) the walking route of Wordsworth's “Residence in London” in Book Seven, linking the sites mentioned (and not mentioned) with images and text related to those sites on a historical map contemporaneous with three different moments: 1794-1797, 1805, and 1850. Thus the following critical questions will be explored: Because Neatline allows the designer to conjoin the map and the primary text, does the act of plotting spatial patterns embedded within the representation of the urban landscape ameliorate a purportedly teleological process? When do platforms obfuscate our ability as humanists to critically reflect on potential acts marginalization?

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 1:30pm - 1:45pm
COOR 186 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 186

1:45pm

Technoliterate Lives
Nearly 30 years after the genesis of the world wide web, internet and computer literacies are still often conceptualized through an all-or-nothing binary. 15 years after its publication, Marc Prensky's 2001 framework of "Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants" remains a powerful metaphor frequently employed to describe this binary opposition: users are either "digital natives" born into a wired world, or "digital immigrants" who struggle to learn to navigate the land of the internet and communicate in its strange new language as non-native speakers of tech.

This presentation aims to complicate the conception of a digital native/immigrant divide by examining the technoliterate lives of older adults—articulating the preliminary results of an ongoing ethnographic study of computer and internet users, age 60+, in a Florida retirement community. The data and reflections gathered thus far reflect that digital literacy development and practice continues across a lifetime, and, as the speaker will argue, is an integral component of the civic, intellectual, social, and cultural participation of older adults in American society. With this study, the speaker adds to the understanding of digital literacy and engagement by starting inquiry from the lives of an important community that has remained largely un(der)examined by both humanities and technology scholars. To conclude, the speaker will make a case for a broader understanding of intersectionality, that encompasses not only race, gender, class, and sexuality, but also age as an important element of identity and category of analysis, particularly within a constantly wired and increasingly aging American population.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 1:45pm - 2:00pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

1:45pm

Challenge of Developing a Digital Humanities Center in India
This talk will reflect on the efforts of the team at the Center of Digital Humanities, Pune (CDH Pune) in establishing that center, and offer an outreach and consulting based model for new DH centers in underfunded contexts in the Global South. Taking up the conference’s focus on work, this talk will focus on the socio-technical, scholarly, and postcolonial labor practices which underpin CDH Pune.

When CDH Pune was instituted in 2013, it did not have substantive financial support. However, there was a strong scholarly interest, in Maharashtra, and more broadly, in India, in learning about the Digital Humanities. To fulfill this need, and act within our resources, we adopted an outreach and consulting approach as a nascent DH center. The goal of this outreach and consulting model is to cultivate a local DH community before undertaking major DH research projects. As a result of this approach, CDH Pune has successfully organized several DH events, and promoted DH as a central theme in two international conferences in India. The Center also offered consulting services for institutions that had resources, were interested in the Digital Humanities but required orientation. One of the projects which emerged from these consultations is a DH Certificate Course, designed by CDH Pune and to be offered at Pune University.

Our talk at HASTAC 2016 will discuss the successes and challenges of this model for new DH centers. We will particularly emphasize the postcolonial and decolonial principles which guide this model. As DH knowledge production primarily occurs in DH centers in Euro-American contexts, CDH Pune is committed to fostering a local and Indian DH, rather than importing Euro-American DH concerns. These postcolonial commitments are also reflected in our labor ethics, ranging from decisions about who builds and maintains IT infrastructures to which speakers are invited to events.


Thursday May 12, 2016 1:45pm - 2:00pm
COOR 186 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 186

2:30pm

Disrupting the Archive: Multi-media approaches to Latina/os and Eugenic Sterilization in 20th century California
Over 60,000 people were sterilized in the United States during the 20th century under eugenic laws in 32 states. California led the nation in eugenic sterilizations performing over 20,000, or one-third of the total sterilizations, on patients in state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane.” Through a collaborative project called Eugenic Rubicon: An Interactive Archive of Sterilization in 20th Century California, Drs. Lira, Wernimont, and Stern seek to make the history of eugenic sterilization in California visible, accessible, and interactive through the use of digital platforms, big data analysis, data visualization, and interpretative devices. Our project draws from a one-of-a-kind archive of close to 20,000 patient sterilization records from California institutions from the period 1919-1952. In this panel we will share our efforts to integrate questions of race, gender, sexuality and the particular experiences of Latina/o patients in meaningful and transformative ways. We will preview our web platform, present demographic and statistical analysis related to Latina/o patient records, and “perform the archive” through interactive sonic and haptic interpretations of data. Within new media studies and digital humanities, haptics (vibrotactile perception) and sonics have emerged as important ways of knowing and draw attention to the affective dimensions of computational and archival work. Our panel is deliberately promiscuous with respect to disciplines and practices, entangling distinct modes and methods of scholarship and artistic practice to transgress disciplinary boundaries. We seek to create new digital and multi-sensorial ways of embodying, conveying, and humanizing lived experiences of Latina/os subjected to multiple forms of bodily and bureaucratic erasure.

Beyond sharing research on Latina/o patients’ experiences of sterilization in California institutions during the 1920s-1950s, this panel seeks to engage the panelists, respondents, and audience in questions related to multi-media and multi-sensorial approaches to historical archives, the role of digital humanities in Latina/o Studies, and how to responsibly share the personal stories of Latina/o patients whose lives and bodies were violated by the state.


Thursday May 12, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

2:30pm

Speculative Classroom Design: What’s Your University Worth Fighting For?
In this panel, we invite audience participants to imagine “a university worth fighting for,” one that seeks to promote inclusivity, justice, and equality. In doing so, we aim to think beyond many of the institutions, disciplines, pedagogies, and academic practices in U.S. higher education today, which effectively reproduce the status quo by emphasizing exclusivity, ratings, and selectivity rather than broad access and equity. Based on our experiences organizing the year long HASTAC/Futures Initiative “University Worth Fighting For” #fight4edu series, this panel will feature several short five-minute presentations by respondents, each of whom attempt to reimagine the university, starting from the site of the classroom. The remainder of the session will be devoted to imaginative, speculative, and interactive exercises that aim to inspire audience members, and collaborative strategizing about how we can actualize our universities worth fighting for. Our goal is to offer audience members egalitarian practices and techniques they can use to transform the power structures in their own classrooms tomorrow--and principles and theories they can then use to apply these techniques to larger issues of university transformation: curriculum revision, disciplinary structures, credentialing and reward systems, labor practices, and beyond.

This interactive session is part of the “University Worth Fighting For” #fight4edu series.


Thursday May 12, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

2:30pm

Loose-ing Our Heads: Knowledge-Making Across the Social Body
Historically, the concept of embodied cognition distinguished itself from the assumption that cognition only happened in the brain. By contrast, Big Data promises the omniscience of surveillance and the infallibility of algorithms, offering disembodied processing as a way to render theoretical models, the people/bodies who generate them, and the geographies of their development irrelevant. In such a time, locating cognition in bodies and place becomes a distinction once again. But what are the affordances of once more tethering knowledge making to a set of bodies and their histories? Why, in practical rather than ethical terms, would an academic be interested in her body or her community as a knowledge-making resource?

Drawing on the fields of Communication, Education, Cognitive Science, and Science and Technology Studies, this workshop explores the qualities of the incongruent sets that result from computational, personal, and collaborative knowledge making practices. It first reminds us that approaching knowledge with an eye to its generative locations reveals a thick and socially located history out of line with the origin stories that seat “pure” science in nature. Then, it follows concepts of knowledge making from the brain, through the body, and into collaboration between multiple bodies. Finally, it offers extended hands-on engagement to both to demonstrate concepts and while reflexively generating understanding of our academic practices of embodied cognition.

During the majority of this workshop, participants will employ applied techniques drawn from open space practices, active learning, popular education, critical pedagogy, and applied theater, developing facility with these tools while performing them to generate a collaborative map of our embodied academic practices and the social dynamics in which they are located. The results of these practices will be visible both through material documentation and observable performances.


Thursday May 12, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

2:30pm

Access, Expansion, and Boundaries in the Digital Humanities
What is the university’s responsibility to the public? How can it reach new populations? How can it participate in, influence, and learn from social and political movements happening outside of its boundaries? These are age old questions that are being asked and answered in new ways with the advent of digital humanities and online platforms of learning. In unprecedented ways, universities today have new avenues to reach and converse with populations, practitioners, activists, and leaders once outside its reach.

However, these new possibilities also open wider questions of access and reach. In what ways do online and digital educational technologies allow for new pedagogical possibilities reaching ever new students and participants? But also, we must ask, in what ways do new technologies limit our imaginations and conversations? Are universities also limiting their conversations through this emphasis on digital media? In other words, do these new possibilities both broaden and limit the academy’s reach and conversations with the public, and if so, what are the benefits and costs of the classroom’s new engagement with technology?

This panel asks these questions in the context of specific educational technologies: twitter, multi-modal dissertations, Massive Open Online Courses, and concept mapping. With each technology, we ask about the possibilities of new conversation partners, new students and populations reached by the academy. But we are also attuned by the limitations of the conversations. What boundaries do we redraw? How can we broaden access? How can we continue to be mindful of our limitations in the face of technology, and seek ever new ways of inclusion?


Thursday May 12, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR 186 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 186

2:30pm

Teaching Foreign-Language and Cross-Cultural Digital Media
This proposal for a panel of four long papers stems from the ongoing discussion animated by the interdisciplinary group "Understanding Film and Media Cultures in a Digital World" (https://www.hastac.org/groups/understanding-film-and-media-cultures-digital-world). The group, created in September 2015 by a small network of HASTAC scholars and mentors based at Vanderbilt University and Queen’s University Belfast, explores issues related to digital pedagogy in these two, only apparently unrelated, disciplines: on the one hand, Foreign Languages; on the other, Media Studies.
While cultural globalization and digital technologies have had an enormous impact on every field in the Humanities, these two disciplines have seen their very objects of study and pedagogical contexts dramatically affected by these phenomena. Only a few years ago, students’ direct contact with foreign-language texts, cultural works and speakers/writers, as well as with global media would mostly take place within the classroom, the library, and other few, selected places. Nowadays, thanks to our networked laptops and smartphones, such contact is uninterrupted and omnipresent.
Teaching and learning cross-cultural and foreign-language media has thus to be conceptualized as a very different experience than in the recent past. The papers presented in this panel will explore this theme from different perspectives, trying to combine language-based and media-focused approaches. Hughes and Pagello will provide a general framework, building on linguistics and media theory, as well as on their different but finally not incomparable experiences of teaching Spanish in the American South, and teaching world cinema in Northern Ireland. Finch and Hagele will look at the uses of social media (respectively, Twitter and Instagram) in the foreign-language classroom. Ellis-Woods will reflect on the lessons to be learned from the history of the educational programming created by the BBC in the highly sensitive cross-cultural, multilingual environment of Northern Ireland.


Thursday May 12, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

4:00pm

Footprints of PR in the News: Investigating Patterns of Text Reuse
This interdisciplinary project combines methods from computer science and computational linguistics with manual content analysis to address the issue of news media reliance on content supplied by public relations sources - a topic that has been prominent in media studies for many decades.

Studies going back as far as the early 20th century have reported that a considerable percentage of newspaper content had originated as publicity. Such content was never impartial: the use of adverbs and adjectives favoring the client went hand in hand with presenting the story from a client's perspective, thus, in the words of Walter Lippmann (1922), painting a picture “the publicity man” wished the public to see. Recent scholarship has consistently pointed to the same issues, raising concerns over media serving the needs of the PR industry instead of serving the public.

Most of the studies addressing this topic cite evidence of anecdotal nature or fail to demonstrate a relationship between the source and the resulting coverage. This limitation is methodological and is explained by the scope of the required data analysis. To address this limitation, a pilot study was conducted that used computation to collect 6,171 press releases and 48,664 potentially related articles and identify all instances of text reuse. Although the results suggested that the extent of media's reliance on publicity sources has been exaggerated, computational analysis also revealed a striking example of PR influence, which called for further investigation.

This project focuses on computationally exploring the discovered instances of text reuse in terms of language, sentiment, and overall themes, with a particular focus on quotations - a staple of any press release. The results will be available as an online visualization tool enabling the user to interactively explore the data, visualize patterns of text reuse, as well as language patterns in press releases.


Thursday May 12, 2016 4:00pm - 4:05pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:00pm

Monster Collaborations: Approaching the Frankenstein Bicentennial through the Humanities and Informal STEM Learning
We would like to propose a custom session around a newly launched interdisciplinary effort that we think aligns closely with the HASTAC 2016 theme. This four-year project on transmedia public engagement will culminate in a set of activities timed to the bicentennial of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, using this pervasive modern myth to engage public audiences around contemporary science-in-society questions. The project’s major activities (abstract attached in separate file) include the creation of a digital museum for curating and sharing a wide range of digital artifacts, a set of Frankenstein’s Footlocker activity kits for use in science centers, museums and other supervised settings, and a series of maker challenges and activities using easily available materials.

This custom session will introduce the project and discuss its potential as a compelling model for research that unites approaches from the digital humanities, social sciences, museum studies, design and allied fields. Since all of the grant’s principal investigators are based fully or primarily at ASU, we have a unique opportunity to introduce the HASTAC community to a diverse collaborative research team (and vice versa) to share work in progress on a major humanities-focused effort.

For the panel we would request either 60 or 90 minutes, depending on the wisdom of the program committee, to achieve three primary goals:

1) lay out the current status of the project through short presentations from project investigators

2) play-test prototype activities from the Footlocker and maker challenges to solicit feedback from HASTAC attendees

3) leave time for higher-level discussion about the project as an example of (we hope) broadly impactful, publicly engaged humanities research.


Thursday May 12, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

4:00pm

An Archive and Repertoire of Digital Humanities and Media Projects in the Performing Arts
The digital has created not only new methods of communication and exchange, but also changed our ways of conceptualizing both performing arts generally, and the knowledge-production in and around the performing arts. In recent years, the digital humanities have been the locus for a more general, interdisciplinary conversation around these issues. While there is a long tradition of performance-based experimentation with technology — ranging from the futurists’ performances to contemporary motion capture dances by artists — the question of how the performing arts can fit into the discourse of the digital humanities seems to be a fairly new one. For many scholars, the digital humanities and performing arts have been equated with the quantitative study of plays and other textual elements of theatre as well as movement in dance-related projects.

This session queries the more wide-ranging impact of the digital humanities on theatre and performance studies and the artistic practices in the field but will also inquire about the impact of performance theory on the digital humanities. What might digital theories and practices offer to scholarly and critical analyses of theatre and performance practice? How has the field of the digital humanities been and continues to be impacted by performance theory and practice? What are some of the challenges and possibilities that the interconnected fields of digital humanities and theatre and performance studies are facing today?

Before the conference, participants create a collective bibliography, and a number of reflections on HASTAC.org. At the conference, participants will demo projects or performances. This is followed by a conversation about the questions above or other questions and commonalities coming up during the run of the session.

Concretely, the session, in its entire run, will generate a collaboratively created blog and conversation, reflecting on the impact of digital humanities-oriented projects on the field of theatre and performance studies as well as theatre, drama, and performance in itself, and the impact of performance theory and performance practices on digital humanities.


Thursday May 12, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

4:00pm

You Have the Right to Rest: Arbitrating the War on Sleep
With sleep deprivation being historically weaponized in interrogation and warfare tactics it comes to some surprise that such little attention is given to the education and protection of our nation’s own sleep health. Johnathan Crary’s analysis in his 2014 publication 24/7 underscores the issues of sleep health that proliferate late capitalistic society. Unceasing consumer-production demands, addiction to visual and social media, the ever-present wakening force of electric light, and the absence of sleep health educational programs add up to an endangering ignorance of sleep-related disease and imminent disaster. The preventative practice that could save us from the fatalistic nature of sleep deprivation is kept out of reach in order to sustain an “always on” consumerist culture. Arbitrating the war on sleep falls to the powerful collective appeals of art, science, education, and public policy formation.

The erosion of sleep is an erosion of physiological health as well as psychological stability and an undermining of a universal cultural connection. Sleep and dreams are revered by past cultures in fictive mythologies, art, and literature. Our disconnection from sleep is a disconnection from humanity.

Liminal sculpture artist Aaron Williams leads this discussion with an introduction to his installation studies on sleep medicine, philosophy, and mythology entitled somnbody somnwhere. Williams co-facilitates sleep research by repurposing clinical tools such as electrooculography and medicine-related concepts like sleep-debt into sculptural performances embedded with digital applications.

This discussion invites attendees to address the question: How can liberal arts restore sleep to a restless society? Participants will be prompted to critically analyze the problems of sleep in current society and how technology, education, and the humanities can collectively uproot these issues. Emergent strategies connect interdisciplinary places of research through the philanthropic effort to restore the right to rest.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
COOR 186 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 186

4:00pm

Building the University Worth Fighting For: Tools for Pedagogical, Institutional, and Social Change
How does the development of technological tools and platforms relate to the mission of higher education as a public good? As digital technologies become increasingly integrated into our pedagogical practice, it is fundamental that we develop a critical framework for understanding the ethical and social implications of their use. While freely available “Web 2.0” technologies such as Twitter, Facebook, and Google Docs offer educators exciting opportunities to foster energetic forms of student collaboration, these tools deprive students of rights over their data and foster a passive, consumer-oriented relationship towards technology. Additionally, the inability to install open-source computational tools on university computers prevents students from exploring and understanding the computational methods that are becoming an ever greater force in everyday life. To counter these challenges, students and faculty at The CUNY Graduate Center have been developing new digital tools to bring computational methods and the affordances of “Web 2.0” into the classroom in an ethical, participatory, and accessible manner. Moderated by Katina Rogers, and featuring Digital Fellows and Futures Initiative Fellows from The CUNY Graduate Center, this interactive session will provide an overview of the differences between free and proprietary educational software and demo three tools currently in development at the Graduate Center: Social Paper, a non-proprietary socialized writing environment; DH Box, a cloud-based lab that enables classrooms to easily explore a range of computational tools without administrative privileges; and CBOX, an open-source, self-hosted social network. Session participants will be invited to interact with these tools during the panel, exploring ways to incorporate these resources into their own research and pedagogy.

This interactive session is part of the “University Worth Fighting For” #fight4edu series.


Thursday May 12, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

4:05pm

Defaced: Biometric Facial Recognition and the Queer Politics of Escape
Biometric devices use physiological characteristics such as fingerprints, palm veins and prints, face recognition, DNA, iris and retina recognition, and scent to identify individuals and groups. This data is often collected from consumers and citizens by retailers and government agencies with the promise of fast, easy, and flexible access to personal networks, products, and information.

As a result of the collection of this data, biometric devices have the ability to identify individuals on the basis of race, gender, and sexual orientation. The identificatory practices on which biometric data rely upon to function are stable and normative. Identity, however, is not static, and nuance often leads to the failure of biometric devices to process biometric data and produce coherent results. This incoherence speaks to the inevitable inability to account for the complexity of personal identity, and it begs us to question the extent to which we are willing to allow biometric data to speak for us.

This paper situates itself at this moment of failure and considers the ways in which practices of “defacement” and intelligibility might be more desirable than visibility and recognition. Specifically, this work examines the critical intervention made by contemporary artists such as Zach Blas whose Facial Weaponiztion Suite positions escape as more than a desire to exit current regimes of control, but also as a way to cultivate forms of living otherwise. Escape, Blas argues “is a collective attempt—aesthetic, conceptual, political—to eradicate forms of control, exploitation, and domination, which just might make the world more hospitable to all” (rhizome.org).

This project asks timely and important questions regarding the impact of surveillance on civil and human rights. Its position at the intersection of the arts and sciences encourages critical reflection upon the role of biometric technology in everyday lived experiences, and highlights the important role the arts play in the development of science and technology.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 4:05pm - 4:10pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:10pm

#writersofinstagram: An Online Affinity Space for Visual Writing
Online spaces allow people to participate in diverse experiences that connect them with other like-minded people, across the country and around the world. These connected experiences allow not only for the construction of communities, but also for the construction of relationships that allow for exploration of identity and the creation of ties. Instagram is a mobile social network that privileges image over text: posts on Instagram must include an image with text being optional. Organizing hashtags and content creation tools allow for the formation of affinity spaces on Instagram. Here, I focus on the affinity space created around #writersofinstagram and how it serves as a space for passionate users to discuss their own and others’ writings. Affinity spaces are either physical or virtual spaces in which people can come together around a shared passion (Gee, 2005). Affinity spaces must offer not only a shared space for communication, but also a space to create and display content. Accordingly, Instagram provides a unique mixture of visual and textual space that is being used by the #writersofinstagram community to create, share and discuss user created pieces of writing. In addition, the #writersofinstagram community and the relationships formed within it provide a space for personal learning and growth centered around a passionate pursuit as well as the opportunity for individuals to progress from novices to experts within the space. Understanding the motivations behind posts within the #writersofinstagram affinity space can provide insight into the changing practices of digital writers and creators of multimodal texts. By learning more about the nature of writing affinity spaces online, we can then begin to understand why users choose to post and share text in visual spaces. Looking at understanding the purposes and products of those posting to the #writersofinstagram space can also help researchers interested in the way writing is changing in the digital age to understand how process of composition is evolving and growing.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 4:10pm - 4:15pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:15pm

Identity & Representation in Student Documentaries: Stories of Concern and Hope
Identity and representation, especially in regards to gender, sexuality, and race, are current national conversations that are necessary to bring into the classroom, but must be done so in a safe way. This 5 minute short paper will discuss one digital method to have students lead and navigate these complex issues in conversations. Based off of Halbritter’s (2013) Mics, Cameras, Symbolic Action, Halbritter and Lindquist’s (2012) article “Time, Lives, and Videotape: Operationalizing Discovery in Scenes of Literacy Sponsorship,” Weiner’s (1986) article “Collaborative Learning in the Classroom: A Guide to Evaluation,” and Bruffee’s (1984) article “Collaborative Learning and the ‘Conversation of Mankind,” I will read findings from two student lead documentary projects from Michigan State University’s Advanced Multimedia Writing - one on racial identities being portrayed in the media and the second on gender identities being constructed by their surrounding spaces. These students brought these conversations into the classroom by choice and through an art medium, which enabled them to have creative freedom and agency to offer messages of hurt and optimism for injustices to change. I see this work as one method to have important conversations. In addition, I question how this approach can be furthered. For instance: in what ways can professors allow students to lead conversations on local communities, national conversations, or worldwide systems through digital spaces? How can we facilitate an interdisciplinary approach to complex problems in order to converse with students on potential solutions?

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 4:15pm - 4:20pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:20pm

The Potential of the Past: Walking Through the Creation of an Open Access Collection of Faculty-Produced Holocaust Site Photographs
University libraries are often called upon when faculty are ready to part with their book collections and/or their research data. This paper presents one such case, when Professor Emeritus Duane Mezga of the Landscape Architecture Program approached the library, along with a three-ring binder full of Kodachrome 64 color slides.

The photographs were taken by Professor Mezga in the early 1990s using the progressive realization technique, which captures the experience of walking through a site. Twenty-one sites in total, including concentration camps and killing centers, transit points, and other historically significant sites in Europe were photographed. Memorials present at these sites were documented. Potential in these slides was seen by the subject librarian, and cooperation with the digital curation unit led to the digitization of the slides.

The Duane Mezga Holocaust Site Photography collection is built using a free and open source (FOSS) technology stack utilizing Fedora Commons, Apache Solr, and Drupal CMS (Islandora). Metadata is deliberately foregrounded in the repository architecture: the primary navigation interface is an interactive map built in CartoDB which utilizes geocoded metadata fields to place significant sites from the photographs onto a map — clicking on the site will execute a search on that location. Additionally, because the actual XML data are indexed, searching metadata is divorced from the limitations of the traditional database structure and is amplified by the additional functionality of an enterprise indexing system including string manipulations, stemming, wildcards, highlighting, proximity searching and faceting among other features.

The Holocaust Site collection website will be launched this academic year. With the enormous changes in the political and physical landscape which occurred with the fall of the Soviet Union, and the development of new memorials and museums at these sites, the potential use of the collection is wide. This locally-produced open access collection will provide a new avenue for exploring change over time, for the production of new knowledge across disciplines and geography, and for further conversation on war, landscape, and memorialization.


Thursday May 12, 2016 4:20pm - 4:25pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:25pm

Fugitive Archiving: Ephemera and Community Expressions
Archival tradition is based on colonial power dynamics that surround exclusive histories with “negative space,” leaving those whose histories are excluded to perform their own archival scenarios using ephemeral materials and expressions. Community is a theme connecting many histories constructed in these dynamic ways because communities are entities of action with fluid boundaries, making their histories ill-suited for traditional archiving. In this dissertation work I recognize communities’ dynamic expressions as history construction and study ephemera as residues of these expressions, because community histories warrant archival inclusion and because such inclusion supports the archival profession’s relevance in increasingly dynamic information landscapes. My work here is grounded in archival scholarship by Bastian (2003) around “communities of records” that has ignited new interest in communities’ embodied expressions, albeit with questions remaining around how we can include embodied expressions in archival practice. I use communities of records as a starting point, and propose the study of ephemera – reenvisioned through the lens of performance studies - is one method of archiving around communities. Through this reenvisioning lens I study one case of dynamic history construction around a community event: The All Souls Procession of Tucson, Arizona, a massive grassroots parade in honor of the dead now in its 25th year. I conduct qualitative analysis of ephemeral history construction in this community event, from which I draw themes and strategies for evoking commemoration in community settings. Through this study of dynamic history construction, I hope to offer archival science a new conceptualization of ephemera as an archival directive, to include embodied expressions in archival practice, build more inclusive histories, and help archivists form more vital relationships with dynamic communities and disciplines.
Bastian, J. A. (2003). Owning memory: how a Caribbean community lost its archives and found its history (No. 99). Libraries Unlimited.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 4:25pm - 4:30pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:30pm

Softwares, Histories, Memories and Archives
I propose to think with the audience about this question: How can software be written to pay attention to listening, a crucial component of engagement with testimonies and memories?

As a scholar-practitioner, my work is an example of thinking with theoretical/academic spheres as well as with technical/practical spheres across narrative intelligence, software studies and digital humanities. I intend to address this question through my project titled We Are History.

In pursuit of generating communal dialogue in the context of inability to have conversations about our contested history in Lebanon, I set out to build an Artificial Agent that would sift through an oral history video archive of testimonies of daily life with the task of figuring out common threads, sometimes confirming and sometimes contesting each other, and automatically editing many different versions of possible histories. This automatic montage machine addresses two problems in the Lebanese context: first, it circumvents the tiring accusation of being biased since a machine is now the moderator (presenting a multiplicity of stories might be the closest one can get to strategic objectivity) and second, it opens up the possibility of conversation by weaving various and often opposing perspectives in order to start imagining what our histories could look like. The project, which would reside online as well as in booths in public spaces across Lebanon, invites people to listen to an automated montage of oral histories and to then share their own stories and memories. Each newly contributed story is instantly added to the archive, analyzed using new developments in computational corpus-based linguistics, automatic story generation, and social computing and tagged with its transcript which enables the interface to incorporate newly added video interviews into the pool concerning the event discussed, thereby changing the version of history previously compiled.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 4:30pm - 4:35pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:40pm

Digital Poetics of Democracy:
Is there a digital poetics of democracy? How has Twitter changed the political rhetoric of nations such as Spain, Portugal, and Greece, that have seen the emergence of new, digitally-centered grassroots political parties? How does Twitter produce a new language of power and opposition? This talk analyzes Twitter data from Spain’s Podemos and Ciudadanos, and Portugal's LIVRE! grassroots political parties for their most commonly tweeted parts of speech (verbs, adverbs, adjectives, nouns) and hastags. I will begin with a brief discussion of the very notion of a digital poetics and of Twitter as a form of digital opposition and power, describe how I have used Python and the Stanford Parser to analyze and tag the parts of speech and hashtags from these parties' tweets, and share my findings. The goal of this study is to begin to examine what might be construed as a digital poetics of democracy, power, and opposition in 21st century Spain and Portugal and to consider how this rhetoric differs from that of other, traditional political communications.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 4:40pm - 4:45pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:45pm

To Trump Trump's Wall: Designing a Framework for Participatory, Co-Creative Media and Politcial Design Practice
To Trump Trump’s wall is participatory media art project created in response to Donald Trump’s campaign promise to build a giant wall in the border between Mexico and the United States. In this paper I present a brief contextual review describing Trump’s position in regards of the wall. Next, I delineate the theoretical perspectives and approaches that materialize in a form of practice of co-creative media based on participatory culture and political and adversarial design with my own approach to critical making. This paper presents the results of two iterations of the project, one in the form of a workshop and the other in a gallery setting, and highlights the different outcomes from each setting and audience group. 

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 4:45pm - 4:50pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

5:30pm

5:30pm

FemTechNet Meetup
We'll meet up at the evening reception (BAC 116) and then move to Tapacubo (225 East Apache Boulevard)

Thursday May 12, 2016 5:30pm - 9:00pm
Tapacubo 225 East Apache Boulevard
 
Friday, May 13
 

7:30am

Conference Registration
Friday May 13, 2016 7:30am - 10:30am
COOR 976 S Forest Mall, Tempe, AZ 85281

8:00am

Student Poster Competition
Friday May 13, 2016 8:00am - 9:00am
Coor Breezeway
  • Session Location TBA

8:00am

Continental Breakfast
Join us to start your morning with a complimentary continental breakfast located in the COOR breezeway.

Friday May 13, 2016 8:00am - 9:30am
COOR 976 S Forest Mall, Tempe, AZ 85281

9:00am

Keynote "Experience Architecture: How the Humanities Goes to Work"
Liza Potts is the director of WIDE, a research center in the College of Arts and Letters. Her major project examined the use of social media during times of disaster. Her current work looks at participatory memory, fan and artist co-production, and social media pedagogies. Liza is leading a new program in Experience Architecture, and teaches in our Professional Writing and Digital Humanities programs. She is chair of the Association for Computer Machinery’s Special Interest Group on Design of Communication (SIGDOC). She has worked for Microsoft, consultancies, and start-ups in the tech industry. She earned her Ph.D. in Communication and Rhetoric from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Speakers
avatar for Liza Potts

Liza Potts

Associate Professor, Michigan State University


Friday May 13, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
COOR 170 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 170

10:15am

Coffee Service
Fresh coffee will be availble in the COOR breezeway. 

Friday May 13, 2016 10:15am - 11:00am
COOR 976 S Forest Mall, Tempe, AZ 85281

10:30am

Crowdsourced Geo-Data Meets Sexual Violence: Activism, Design, and the Ethical Life of Technologies
Bangladesh’s birth is grafted on the memory of widespread sexual violence; the 1971 Independence War witnessed the weaponized rape of 200,000 Bengali women. Once ‘liberated’, survivors lost ownership over their experience of trauma as the narrative became symbolically and materially re-constituted by the state. Scholars such Yasmin Saikia have pressed against this legacy, retrieving suppressed voices and speaking to their “rich,” “varied,” and “polyversal” nature.

The recent surge in gender-based and sexual violence, as indicated by the even depressed official figures, has drawn attention to the plight of Bengali women yet again. In November 2014, VICE News ran an expose on Bangladesh’s “rape epidemic,” one rooted in traditionalist values “intent on the subjugation of women.”

Similar accounts by media, human interest reports, and scholarship reveal an increased effort to circumvent the social and institutional conditions silencing rape survivors in Bangladesh, intervening by “giving voice” – whether through the circulation of curated narratives, turning the lens onto subaltern spaces, or the proliferation of ‘technologies of testimony.’

‘Technologies of testimony’ are created with the intent to capture, process, represent and intervene on sexual violence – Bijoya’ and ‘Protibadi are just two of a growing number of initiatives attempting to do so through the adoption of crowdmapping software that produces a “geospatial visualization of testimony.”

Existing literature, both by the designers of these projects and those critical of their externalities, has failed to provide an account of the complex, socially situated design processes from which these technologies arise – the way in which moments of ‘closure’ affix certain forms of knowledge politics to the material constitution and social practices of activist cybercartography.

This paper begins by refusing an account of digital technology as merely a prosthetic for human capacities. Unpacking the technological affordances of cybercartography and tracking the ways in which these analog to digital conversions inflect upon a projects like ‘Bijoya’, I argue that participatory crowdmapping of sexual violence in Bangladesh subordinates social justice to a fetish of data and technocratic rationality.

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 10:30am - 10:45am
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

10:30am

Black Voices in Digital Spaces
As social media becomes an increasingly ubiquitous part of our daily lives I am drawn to the work of Black women vocally engaged in activism on Twitter. They are creating hashtags to raise awareness, organizing marches, and educating people about what it means to be Black in a world that violently attacks them on a daily basis. I find their public discourse work to be some of the most important digital work happening right now. Their voices are necessary in this ever-evolving social justice moment. In the first volume of Debates in the Digital Humanities Matthew Gold lays out the division between scholarly factions in the digital humanities. He says, “Indeed, fault lines have emerged within the DH community between those who use new digital tools to aid relatively traditional scholarly projects and those who believe that DH is most powerful as a disruptive political force that has the potential to reshape the fundamental aspects of academic practice”(x). I argue that this disruptive political force that asserts Black voices in the public sphere is a crucial part of the potential for digital humanities work. The digital humanities needs to make space for Black women’s voices, particularly those engaged in world changing work outside of the confines of the academy. Digital humanities scholarship needs to bridge the divide between the academy and the public. By bringing social justice work into the classroom, critically engaging new media, and amplifying Black activist voices, the digital humanities can do relevant social justice work. This presentation will look at Black feminist digital activism and the need for the field of the digital humanities to engage in the work of transforming the academy and society.

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 10:30am - 10:45am
COOR 186 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 186

10:30am

Wikipedia in the Classroom: A Window on Technical Communication Praxis
One of the challenges faced by new technical communication students is understanding the praxis of their new discipline. The work of technical communicators is both visual and textual, in and about technology, interdisciplinary and, in contrast to students’ common conception of writing, highly collaborative. The open-source online encyclopedia Wikipedia contains rich evidence of technical communication in action that expresses all of these qualities. In particular, Wikipedia’s Talk pages preserve the ongoing dialogue in which community members create knowledge and engage in meta-discourse on the production of digital, multimedia texts. This paper argues for the value of Talk pages for helping students understand the praxis of technical communication through two synergistic methods of analysis. In the first method, which draws on the work of Selfe and Selfe, students create a “text cloud” of Talk page text in order to locate the recurring concerns of technical communicators. In the second method students perform a close reading of Talk page text to uncover the complexities of how those concerns are expressed to accomplish a shared goal. This research provides benefits typically associated with job-shadowing, service learning, or client work. In particular, students can understand the role of technical communication in a community that is digital and worldwide, and which collectively maintains the world’s seventh most popular website.


Friday May 13, 2016 10:30am - 10:45am
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

10:30am

A Digital Renaissance: Innovating in Medieval and Early Modern Studies
Technology has proven to have a great impact on humanistic research in recent years, with many scholars working with and around digital media, the social web, and software that bears on traditional humanities techniques. Highlighting the use of digital humanities scholarship in medieval and early modern studies, this panel is in deep conversation with the past and the present as panelists discuss projects ranging from text analysis tools, dynamic websites, and educational games. Inherently interdisciplinary, these projects can work to increase public engagement with typically academic scholarship, as well as offer new and innovative perspectives on canonical authors that include Shakespeare and Chaucer. As scholarship and pedagogy are increasingly born digital, it is urgently necessary to be able to navigate our humanistic history and origins with a mind to bringing this material and analytical insight to current students, academia, and the learning public. This panel will bring together scholars working in several fields who are working on individual and collaborative digital humanities in the medieval and early modern periods. Brief presentations will foster a broader conversation with HASTAC 2016 conference attendees in order to reimagine and assess digital tools and approaches to humanities scholarship, and projects will be made available for interaction. This panel is sponsored by the HASTAC TAMeR group.


Friday May 13, 2016 10:30am - 11:30am
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

10:45am

Postmortem: critical reflection and creative lessons learned from creating an essay in VR about VR.
Drawing on eight years of humanities work in Brown University’s Cave (VR system), I have been solicited for a critical and creative article on VR by NYT Op docs. The final product would be a reflective piece in VR about VR distributed through the NYT Google cardboard initiative. My written essay will use the methodologies of media archeology and design iteration to talk about society’s cyclical obsession with immersion and the hyped technologies that promise it. It will address the different technologies and epochs of immersion from the advent of the panorama to modern day VR HMDs. Similarities in how these devices are marketed and consumed will be drawn by comparing product descriptions and marketing rhetoric throughout the decades. The reflection will end on the current iteration of VR speculation and ask why we persist in a cultural amnesia of the “immersive” movements that have come before.

The talk at Hastac will present some of my findings in a scholarly light as well as discuss the practical and creative practice of making the VR app that chronicles/documents previous immersive technologies. Some of the sub issues the essay will raise include the dangers of “newness”, the contemporary move to co-opt “storytelling” for marketing practices, and the delicate problem of designing immersive political worlds for the “empathy machine”. I am applying for a paper slot, but suggest a 30-45 minute talk to make room for addressing both the scholarly consequences of this piece and the behind the scenes lessons in immersive design I’ve learned as a practitioner using the Unity Engine. I would also like to bring a few cardboards for hands-on demonstration during the time slot and hope to plan exercise discussion with them and the NYT initiative.

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 10:45am - 11:00am
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

10:45am

Mapping Homelessness
This paper presents preliminary results from a larger research program that asks two interrelated questions: How can digital mapping facilitate new analyses of homelessness? And, how can undertaking socially engaged research on homelessness facilitate new understandings digital mapping? This paper, as a part of that larger project, documents the interpretive process of data analysis in conjunction with the mechanical process of mapping to argue that socially engaged and theoretically informed methods are a vital, if often overlooked, component of scholarship on the geoweb.

Homeless counts are one of the most common measures for determining homeless populations in urban areas. They are conducted as point-in-time exercises, meaning that the data collected represents a snapshot of homelessness on a single day. So, while such counts are statistically limited in what they are able to tell us, they are nonetheless the best instruments currently in use to gather basic data. This project uses the point-in-time dataset of Homeward Trust, a comprehensive community housing organization in Edmonton, Canada, who have undertaken 10 such counts to date.

I argue that to develop maps from this dataset is to develop discursive actors that produce spaces as much as they describe them. To build a map is to build discourse, to build knowledge. The series of maps that I will present in this paper represent just such discursive objects – objects to be read, challenged, and analysed – not simply believed. By highlighting the fact that the scholarship I am producing is, itself, a potential object of study, this paper both tells (some of) the stories of homelessness in Edmonton, and highlights how attentive we must be to the truth claims that our digital productions make, often in spite of our best efforts.

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 10:45am - 11:00am
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

10:45am

Mapping a Global Renaissance with 53,829 Texts
“Mapping a Global Renaissance with 53,829 Texts” redefines our understanding of a squarely humanistic problem: the history of race in Shakespeare’s era. By analyzing thousands of texts beyond the scope of a single famous author, such as Shakespeare or Milton, and even the capacity of the individual reader, I tell a very different story about the multiple discourses of race that helped motivate England’s earliest efforts to define its place in a global context in the era before colonialism. My primary technique, Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) is a topic modeling algorithm that identifies clusters of words exhibiting a disproportionately high probability of occurring together in all texts discussing place names in the 53,829 texts of the Early English Books Online corpus. My results affirm and complicate recent postcolonial accounts of Shakespeare’s world by redefining the ideology of race in a more nuanced way than along the faultlines of identity politics. Through this methodology, I articulate an unfamiliar Renaissance vision of race by challenging the basic assumption that ethnic otherness has always been built upon a bedrock of bodily difference. The pre-modern idea of race was structured by a logic of place. Geography, and not skin color or anatomy, was the dominant factor in setting the terms of the debate. The primary question was how space, landscape, latitude, climate, and a location’s flora and fauna shaped a culture, its people, and their bodies. These results suggest the focus on the body as the measuring stick of racial ideologies should be understood as an invention of a colonialist worldview, and that historical alternatives to understand race in different terms exist. This study thus opens up a critical space to reanimate historically significant but unfamiliar models of race that we have lost in the postcolonial world.

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 10:45am - 11:00am
COOR 186 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 186

10:45am

Constructing Community in Online Programs: A Digital Case Study
Nearly 25% of graduate students are in online programs, a number that is expected to grow by 20% over the next decade (Lederman, 2014; US Department of Education, 2011). Despite their rapid enrollment, online graduate programs have an attrition rate of between 30 and 70%. A sense of community is associated with retention in online programs (Liu, Gomez & Chrerng-Jyh, 2009). This exploratory case study draws on data collected from a cohort of 50 students spread across two online classes during their first semester of an online program to explore how students in online graduate programs construct community. Findings indicate that students and instructors used a variety of innovative practices to facilitate connection and support in the online space. Instructors’ were highly skilled with technology and used a variety of digital tools to foster collaborative learning, connection and community. Students also developed innovative practices to promote peer knowledge sharing and facilitate digital connections. The findings suggest that the proactive, technically savvy efforts of peers and instructors were instrumental in helping online students develop a sense of community.

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 10:45am - 11:00am
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

11:00am

The Eliza Effect and Epistemic Fractures in Mixed Reality Interfaces with A.I. Agents
The paper will examine strategies of evoking an affective response in interactions with machinic intelligence presented in visual, textual and mixed reality forms. Particularly, I will consider the effect of psychological mechanisms of projection and recognition in the context of algorithmic procedures in digital simulation and translation. Mixed reality interfaces - where the 'real' embodied reactions are blended with the 'virtual' datascope - seem to be especially relevant material to explore the productive difference between the representational and performative regimes of engagement with data, as well as the role of software in shifting these regimes. I will show how the issues of projection and illusion of reciprocity that were raised already in the 1960s by Joseph Weizenbaum's chat bot Eliza, have sustained though contemporary practices engaging "intelligent agents".

I will base my analysis on several artistic examples: the interactive video installations "Chameleon" by Tina Gonsalves that explore emotional contagion through technologies of facial expression recognition; the net-art project "psychossensation.xyz" by Ubermorgen; and a recent psychotherapy smartphone application, “Karen," by Blast Theory. In each instance, the user is tricked into an eerily personalized interaction with a software-driven, fictionalized character/figure established through text (“phychossensation") and video ("Chameleon", "Karen"). The questions can be intrusive and overly intimate, and the gazes piercing and emotionally disturbing; yet both are generated as a response to the user’s own reactions and behavioral data, e.g. phone usage. The programs, such as "Karen", morphs to fit the user's everyday life, although pushing the legitimate boundaries and conventions of an interaction with a human life-coach. The resultant feeling oscillates between a suspicious "how do they know?" and a desire to explore the limits of one's vulnerability. This is despite (or due to) the knowledge that the conversation happens mostly within oneself, with a productive illusion of an intelligent and sensitive interlocutor. These exchanges feel unsutured, almost natural - or, as natural and honest as the imagined agency on the other side appears to “feel."

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 11:00am - 11:15am
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

11:00am

What America Ate
The 1930s are a fascinating moment to study food. At a time of economic upheaval, mass internal migrations, and the rapid industrialization of agriculture and the food supply, examining how ordinary people bought, cooked, ate, and thought about food can reveal aspects of American life that scholars still know little about. The project is digitizing and preserving an array of materials related to food in the Great Depression, starting with the original America Eats papers that until now have been scattered around the country. The America Eats project was a Depression-era jobs creation program within the Works Progress Administration, which sent about 200 writers and photographers across the country to chronicle American eating by region. Writers collected amazing stories: interviewing cooks and eaters, transcribing recipes, collecting songs and jokes and poems, and describing all manner of food customs. With few exceptions, the materials have remained in obscurity ever since, unknown to most scholars and unavailable to the general public. The project is also making two other important kinds of culinary sources accessible. The first is rare: 200 local community and charity cookbooks produced around the country from 1930 to 1940, held in the MSU Library’s Special Collections and the UM Library’s Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive. These rare books, produced by small organizations like churches, clubs, and schools, will provide unique insight into the kinds of eating that went on in America during the Depression. Second, the digital archive will include 700+ rare advertisements and food packaging materials produced by food companies in the 1930s from MSU’s Sliker Culinary Ephemera Collection, which highlight how technological and commercial forces were shaping American eating in this era. The paper will show how the project is developing new ways for users to interact with, enhance, and add to the collection of recipes. The project is supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). What American Ate is a unique crowdsourcing digital project that also highlights the changing technologies of food in America.


Friday May 13, 2016 11:00am - 11:15am
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

11:00am

Design for Neurodiversity (DfN): A “Design for X” Process for Alternative Cognitive Styles
Up to 1 in 100 people today are affected by Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), which can manifest as an extreme sensitivity to sensory inputs, impaired social cognition, generalized anxiety, and difficulties with interpersonal communication and the expression of empathy. When an individual's executive functioning is not severely impaired, the autistic cognitive style is characterized by highly creative associative thinking, awareness of detail, and a strong degree of systematizing. The neurodiversity movement has emerged to raise awareness of this unique cognitive style, and help people leverage its strengths. Whereas accessible design envisions systems that are useful to people with disabilities, and universal design creates systems that are usable by all people to the greatest extent possible, there have been no structured design techniques targeting the needs associated with neurodiversity. This is significant because Human-Computer Interface (HCI) research has identified that more effectively addressing the needs of the rapidly increasing neurodiverse population would likely provide benefits for all people. This paper bridges that gap with Design for Neurodiversity (DfN), a new process for designing systems that the targets the sensory, cognitive, and relational aspects of process design. This structured design methodology is based on a comprehensive review of the design process viewed through the lens of Design for X (DfX) methods in concurrent engineering, and utilizes findings from participative ergonomics, participatory and interactive art, and the design of cognitive systems in artificial intelligence.


Friday May 13, 2016 11:00am - 11:15am
COOR 186 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 186

11:00am

Blended Stretch Writing at ASU
The Stretch Writing Program at Arizona State University (ASU) is a year-long, or stretched, version of traditional ENG101 aimed at helping students identified as academically at risk (the majority of whom are also members of at risk racial or economic groups). The program, which has been recognized both internally and nationally, is rooted in more than 20 years of research and practice, and has been extraordinarily successful in helping the at risk population succeed at the university. Starting in 2011, a small team of faculty in the College of Letters and Sciences (then the School of Letters and Sciences) at ASU’s Downtown Phoenix campus began to reimagine the Stretch Writing Program design for the 21st century by incorporating a wide array of digital technologies and pedagogical practices aimed at leveraging that technology to increase student engagement, digital literacies, and writing skills.

This new, blended version of the SWP, which we have called the “Stretch Writing Redesign” (SWR), was first deployed in fall 2012, and has been continually revised and updated since then. In the spring of 2014, SWR was recognized with the ASU Faculty Achievement Award in Curricular Innovation in recognition of both pedagogical innovation and positive early outcomes based on a review of a random and representative sampling of student work from before and after the redesign. In 2015, we were awarded a CCCCs “Research Initiative” grant to determine if (1) SWR represents a viable and measurable improvement of the SWP previously developed at ASU, (2) SWR successfully engages at risk students, and (3) SWR increase levels of engagement that would signal sustainable student success.

Our proposed “long paper” will present the data collected during the first year of the CCCC supported study, as well as (1) some early reflections on how the blended design of the SWR can enable student success in SWR classes, and (2) what it might tell us about the use of blended designs for other courses with at risk populations.


Friday May 13, 2016 11:00am - 11:15am
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

11:00am

Lunch Buffet
Come to the COOR breezeway between 11AM-1PM to enjoy a complimentary lunch buffet. 

Friday May 13, 2016 11:00am - 1:00pm
COOR 976 S Forest Mall, Tempe, AZ 85281

11:15am

Taquerías Conversos: Digital Visualization of Latino Immigrant Impact on Arizona Cityscapes
This presentation uses dynamic digital visualization to provoke unexpected humanist insight into the vibrant impact of immigrants on Arizona cityscapes. Specifically, it tracks a peculiar form of the architectural uncanny that haunts everyday urbanism in metro Phoenix: taquerías. 20 years of intensive immigration brought drive-thru Mexican taquerias, serving cheap, fast, flavorful food. Many inhabit structures abandoned by iconic American fast-food chains (DQ, BK, KFC…), colonizing dead spaces made moribund by sprawl’s centrifugal pull. Taquerias revived stagnant neighborhood economies, catering to an immigrant-inflected palate, and added Latin cultural flair to the city’s subdued design palette. Despite Mexicanized makeovers, even the casual flâneur subliminally registers the iconic architecture haunting the taquerias; ad campaigns trained Americans to recognize instantly their distinctive corporate branding. The project uses 6-second Vine micro-movie loops to reenact this “conversion” from hallmark fast food chain to taqueria, performatively disclosing the homely architectural form “buried alive” beneath exuberant magical-realist redesign. In an era that would sooner squelch especially Mexican immigrant visibility at every turn, metro Phoenix holds immigrants in abundance. But city residents are reluctant to acknowledge—and cultivate—creative ways that migrants already make their imprint. This project invites appreciation for how taquerias conversos recast conventional modes of envisioning the city. The taquerias’ vibrant magical-realist decor conjures prosthetic links to the city’s (Mexican) past and inscribes border-crossing transnationalization into local city spaces. Some relish these changes, others, not so much; for many Phoenicians the bewildering repetition-compulsion of the taquerias conversos evokes an unsettling psychical-spatial estrangement as the city around them hauntingly becomes unfamiliar. For the taquerias' insurgent urbanism swerves beyond city boosters’ defensive vision of sundrenched uniformity toward embracing a complex transnationalized urban future. The video loops take a fresh look at everyday urbanism by making strange the taquerias’ mundane but ubiquitous urban form and artfully aims to lightheartedly provoke in viewers a deeper, humanist comprehension of culinary/cultural challenges posed by the city’s diasporic remaking by Latino immigrants. Sample: https://vine.co/v/MbOztBTWu5j

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 11:15am - 11:30am
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

11:15am

Connecting with the Past Online: The Medieval Portland Case Study
Medieval Portland has developed over the last decade into a robust site housing a database of objects found in institutions throughout the Portland, Oregon region. The initiative originated in Portland State University’s nationally-recognized community based learning capstone program, and a defining feature is that it presents original research pursued by students as well as advanced scholars. It is precisely in that many of the works documented here are relatively modest that they have a distinct contribution to make—the efforts to digitize and publish online manuscripts have inexorably drifted to more prestigious works, leaving many elements of material culture underrepresented in the digital sphere. The Medieval Portland project brings together understudied materials from Portland-area collections into one website. These resources are there to enhance the study of history and visual culture for both students and teachers of regional educational institutions as well as ultimately the broader public.
The Medieval Portland database contains objects from a group of local institutions that are truly diverse—secular and religious, urban and rural, large and small. However varied, the collections that house these medieval manuscripts, paintings, and sculpture together share a paucity of resources that led to a situation in which the prior work on the objects was typically just limited cataloging notations.
As part of our effort to serve the community through our site, we sought and received a National Digital Humanities Award, which allows our current transition of the database to Artstor’s Shared Shelf. This change from the prior Drupal –based database allows us to embrace a broader audience through utilization of this collaborative scholarship portal. Using the foundation of earlier cataloging, nearly two hundred Medieval Portland capstone students over the last decade have pursued additional research and also created a wealth of other media such as photography, explanatory podcasts, video, and even a walking map to local resources.

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 11:15am - 11:30am
COOR 186 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 186

11:15am

Digital empathy-building pedagogies and cyberfeminism
Since Edward Snowden leaked classified documents about US surveillance, conversations of visibility in digital spaces and its ramifications have increased. But these ideas of surveillance and (in)visibility are not new to women who constantly live within the male gaze. Through examples of online harassment, such as #GamerGate, it has become abundantly clear that the Internet is a gendered space where women are not only more visible, but treated differently as well.

In this talk, we will examine the gendered nature of the Internet, and potential tools to build empathy and understanding. Intentional empathy building can work to change the gender imbalance in the tech, STEM, and media industries--the very heart of the knowledge economy. Particular focus will be given to ADAPT, a game developed by women to teach digital risk analysis, as a tool of empathy building and within empathy-building pedagogies.

Finally, we suggest that games such as ADAPT and other empathy-building pedagogies can be used to increase representation of marginalized groups and and greater recognition of issues related to marginalized groups in the pipeline for tech, STEM, and media industries. While this can best be done in higher education, such tools can be applied for younger audiences to develop digital skills and empathy at an earlier age.


Friday May 13, 2016 11:15am - 11:30am
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

11:45am

From Texts to InPhO (and back!)
In this hands on workshop, we will provide an introduction to LDA Topic Modeling using the InPhO Topic Explorer - a new corpus construction and modeling framework made specifically for digital humanists. It features cross-platform support for Windows, Mac, and Linux with a simple single-command installation process. We show how this framework has been used for research on the HathiTrust Digital Library, Darwin's Reading Notebooks, the Old Bailey Online, and the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The Topic Explorer also has the capacity to import any arbitrary collection of PDFs, TEI, and plain-text files. We can show how the process of replicable workflows enables rapid experimentation in the humanities and can enrich exploration by moving from texts to topics and back again.


Friday May 13, 2016 11:45am - 12:45pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

11:45am

Introducing Kronofoto: an open source digital archive management tool for chronological photo collections
Kronofoto is an open source tool for managing small to medium-sized digital photo archives involving a chronological/historical theme. It originated as a web-based digital asset management tool used to host and administer Fortepan Iowa, a digital archive of high resolution amateur photos of Iowa and Iowans taken over the past 150 years. Fortepan Iowa, launched at the University of Northern Iowa and presented at HASTAC 2015, is a collaboration between three different departments, across four different disciplines: public history, computer science, visual communication, and photography. Kronofoto is the technology that enabled this multidisciplinary endeavour: while still a prototype, it was successfully utilized to build an archive consisting of more than 5,000 photos contributed by more than 150 local Iowa donors and processed by 165 students. This paper showcases the first public release of Kronofoto, as well as the lessons our team has learned through managing a digital archive over the past year.

We focus on three key aspects of Kronofoto: browsing facilities, functionality for scholarly use, and interoperability with other repositories. Kronofoto offers a choice of browsing interfaces including chronological, geospatial, and faceted navigation, thus enabling visual exploration of the archive in a nonlinear manner, which is essential for scholarship in the humanities. The functionality designed for scholars includes image annotation and custom image subsets; image URIs provide for image citing and sharing, as well as embedding in blogs and web pages. Finally, Kronofoto implements the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) APIs designed to facilitate reuse of image resources across digital image repositories maintained by cultural heritage organizations.

The ultimate goal of our team is to provide the digital humanities community with a simple tool for building and showcasing digital archives like Fortepan Iowa. We hope Kronofoto becomes that tool.


Friday May 13, 2016 11:45am - 12:45pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

11:45am

Building Undergraduate Liberal Arts Research Skills
The Liberal Arts Collaborative Archive Project seeks to develop an interactive, interdisciplinary, technologically informed, undergraduate research experience that uncovers, recovers, explores, and chronicles the story of the University of Texas at Austin.

The project focuses on developing authentic research skills in the liberal arts. In 1998, Boyer Commission Recommendations emphasized the importance of teaching research skills in college courses. Several studies have linked acquisition of key research skills to succeeding in college and to functioning effectively in an increasingly complex world. Research shows that undergraduates develop these important abilities most effectively through doing and sharing activities associated with research. Most undergraduate research programs focus on STEM fields; this project seeks to provide those opportunities for doing and sharing research in Liberal Arts. The history of the University of Texas provides an entry point for the project because of high student interest and rich and easy access to archival materials.

We see three reiterative project phases: Phase 1: Learning; Phase 2: Planning; and Phase 3: Implementing. Our Phase 1 goal is to discover, through partnerships among student interns, archivists, and faculty, just how students learn to conduct the “moves” basic to research and to navigate archival holdings. We are also interested in exploring ways to engage and work with students in practicing digital history by using the Omeka platform to organize, curate,and publish results of their work.

From student focus groups and journal data, as well as examination of student research products, faculty have learned a great deal about these key areas and have raised questions that they hope to address in Phases 2 & 3
* Person-to-person interactions (faculty and students; students and students)
* Course content
* Course structure

In this Birds of a Feather Session, project members will present key learning and open key questions for discussion in these areas.


Friday May 13, 2016 11:45am - 12:45pm
COOR 186 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 186

11:45am

Makerspaces in libraries : exploring opportunities to expand the culture of makers and technologists
Libraries are inherently democratic institutions, striving to provide equal access to resources and services. From this position in our community, how can we change our services and approaches around digital humanities, makerspaces and innovation services to support a multicultural, diverse community? Specifically, how can we redesign our services to support more women and people of color in our communities.

The scope of the conversation could include, but is not limited to:
How can libraries (and their partners) help to increase opportunities for and exposure to emerging technology, “making” and digital scholarship for a diverse user base?
How are the designs of our spaces and/or services affecting the community we cultivate? How are they contributing to a narrow set of users?
What constitutes an inclusive maker community?
How does the start-up/entrepreneurship community exclude women and people of color?
How do we make “innovation” accessible to a diverse community?

Outcomes:
programming ideas
marketing/outreach strategies
considerations in partnerships and strategic initiatives
future research projects

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 11:45am - 12:45pm
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

1:00pm

ADAPTability of games to teach digital literacy
Digital literacy and its implications on safety have become necessary skills to develop in our interconnected world. In a professional setting, how journalists communicate with whistleblowers through insecure channels can endanger the lives of the journalist and their source. Yet, these skills are rarely taught at journalism school programs (Columbia University being a notable exception). Lack of these skills can also lead to over sharing of information and physical or emotional danger through online harassment.

In this interactive session, we will demonstrate how ADAPT, a game created by CommunityRED to develop skills for risk assessment, can be used as a pedagogical tool to develop critical skills in digital literacy and digital safety. Participants will take the role of an American journalist working in an repressive environment to learn about secure communication and risk analysis in the digital environment.

We will have specific activities to show how different skills can be gained from the same game. After the demonstration, we will hold a short conversation about the learning goals and efficacy of ADAPT for teaching both hard and soft skills around digital security and digital literacy.


Friday May 13, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

1:00pm

Open Stories with Open Sources
Twelve students ages 17-22. Twelve seniors ages 64-93. One semester’s oral history project utilizing open source technologies bridged generations and campuses. Students in Robin Morris’s Oral History class at Agnes Scott College in Decatur, Georgia paired with residents at nearby Clairmont Oaks Assisted Living Residences. The students’ goal was to document some of residents’ life stories and lessons while practicing methodology.

Students used their phones as listening tools—but not in the way one might expect. They shut off the texting, email, and social media and pressed record.

Students uploaded completed interviews to a course website and presented in class. The stories varied-- 35 years in addiction recovery, first job “sexing chicks,” cross-country RV travel, adoptions, elopements-- and showed students that they don’t have to plan everything by graduation.

Working with Alison Valk , Multimedia Instructional Librarian from Georgia Tech, students transformed hourlong interviews into 8 minute podcasts utilizing open source audio editing tools. Students enhanced content and narratives using technology. The same skills they use to write papers became more relatable with technology. For the first time in college, students had a project they shared with family.

At semester’s end, students mounted an exhibit at Clairmont Oaks Assisted Living and hosted a party for the community. Elders received cds of the full interview and podcast and had a product they, too, shared with friends and family.

In this proposed hour session, participants will learn more about how we structured this project how participants might implement a similar project in their own communities. Participants will receive a PDF booklet of lessons, forms, and tips. Attendees will also go through a mini-project beginning with practicing oral history interview techniques. The session will use open source Audacity, a free beginning level software package, to introduce participants to the podcasting part of the project.


Friday May 13, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

1:00pm

Eventuality: Imagining a Future for the Humanities Through Collaborative Storytelling
Eventuality is a narrative foresight engine; a way of crafting a collective story that draws out preconceived biases about the ‘default future’ and illuminates the ways that events, things that may happen, are connected, through the lives of fictional characters. Storytelling can be a useful tool for creating scenarios and gaining insight into futures. Narrative is an accessible form that can be used to engage imaginative capacities, flesh out vital details, illuminate surprising connections, and make the scenario seem more realistic and credible by “worlding the world” of the future. Eventuality is a system designed to help a group move through key questions efficiently in a way that resolves major disputes.

The goal of this Eventuality exercise is to imagine a future for the humanities in a neoliberal university, to draw out and critique what conference attendees believe will happen in their discipline, and to create a consistent and believable story that participants can use as a touchstone for resistance to further cuts in humanities education and research. Participants will be asked to imagine future humanities professors, students, administrators, and citizens, and key events in which a humanistic understanding makes a positive difference in the world and the university.

The end result will be a narrative that illuminates problems facing the humanities today and in the near future, and hopefully demolishes some cliches, as well as a participation in a novel technique for rapidly prototyping stories, which may be used as skeletons for further writing, raw material for thematic analysis, or an introduction to discussing the multiplicity of events and interpretation.


Friday May 13, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

1:00pm

Towards a Diverse and Different DH: An Open Forum to Discuss Protocols and Procedures for the Global Transdisciplinary Digital Humanities
Towards a Diverse and Different DH: An Open Forum to Discuss Protocols and Procedures for the Global Transdisciplinary Digital Humanities seeks to explore the development of protocol and procedures to ensure a positive and harassment-free experience for everyone regardless of gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, ethnicity, origin, or religion.

What questions should individuals, departments, projects, and organizations ask themselves to account for diversity and difference? How might we begin to develop protocols and procedures to understand how to engender a positive experience for digital humanities students, researchers, and collaborators? What evaluative metrics might diversity and difference generate if we begin to consider difference as an essential component of DH? How might we begin to assess teams, projects, departments, journals, and organizations if diversity becomes one of the main assessment criteria?

The goal of this forum will be to facilitate a discussion among digital humanities scholars that will result in an open document that seeks to define and delineate the responsibilities that individuals, organizations, and teams should have when conducting digital humanities teaching and research. And importantly, it will form an open challenge to the DH to seriously address its place in facilitating diversity and difference.

This custom session will be offered as a 2 hour open forum; facilitators, working in conjunction with Dr. Guiliano, will be drawn from the HASTAC2016 program with the goal being that the authorship of the document reflects the interests and knowledge of the attendees themselves.

Links:

http://www.dhsi.org/events.php#ethics+inclusion
http://www.dhtraining.org/hilt2016/statement-values/
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1uPtB0xr793V27vHBmBZr87LY6Pe1BLxN-_DuJzqG-wU/edit
 


Friday May 13, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
COOR 186 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 186

1:00pm

The future of innovation: Transforming our society for saving lives
Mental health professionals (MHPs) tell us that sometimes community members contact them in cases of social media postings that raise concern of suicide so that the MHP can reach out to the individual at risk. Unfortunately, it is often the case that such posts do not receive any reply. The experience of failing to get a response after disclosing thoughts of suicide could exacerbate feelings of isolation and worthlessness, potentially increasing risk of suicide. This situation motivates the need for a safety net which could detect cases of public social media posts that indicate crisis to ensure that they do not go ignored. Previous work by De Choudhury (2013), Jashinsky (2013), and others has shown that machine learning methods can detect signals from social media that indicate depression and risk of suicide. ARKHumanity is new technology which targets the language of depressed individuals who express their thoughts and disappointments through the social network, Twitter. It searches and filters public tweets to identify language that leads to self-harm actions using a machine learning algorithm. This technology also has a front end graphical user interface that helps clinical psychologists, behavioral health experts, and trained volunteers to connect to those who are in crisis by sending them an appropriate reply with relevant resources. Currently there is no technology like this. This interactive presentation will share this new innovative technology, share the preliminary results of the usability study and begin the discussion on how innovation can transform our society to save lives.


Friday May 13, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

2:30pm

Digital Pedagogy and the Future of Higher Education

Digital Pedagogy and the Future of Higher Education

The Duke PhD Lab Digital Pedagogy working group has been working to document and catalogue ways that people transform traditional pedagogical tools into an experience that is more engaging, and built for the world we live in now. The group has also been compiling reviews and use-cases of digital pedagogical tools. We are also interested in imagining and promoting the best methods for facilitating digital literacy and digital skills, as well as discussing and experimenting with radical pedagogy enhanced or made possible by digital spaces or digital concepts. Join us to discuss ways that we can transform higher education using new tools, techniques and collaborations. Our plan for this birds of a feather session is to break out into small group discussions on the following topics:


Digital and Online Teaching Tools

We would like to have a open discussion and workshopping of ideas around digital tools and how they are and could be used for classroom teaching in higher education. Specifically, those interested in foreign language teaching and/or MOOCs are encouraged to participate in this breakout session.


Open Access to Data and Texts

We can do all sorts of interesting things with digital humanities and while teaching those methods has its own set of challenges, obtaining the data or texts to work with is often times the most difficult aspect to teaching digital humanities. Are we to accept what our library can afford access to or can we think of new ways to gain access to that material. We need to construct or hack a space where he can have our students ask whatever research question they want and not be limited to what we have access to.


Role of Technology in the Classroom

We all might agree that today’s technology offers ways to work and teach we couldn’t imagine were possible fairly recently. Maybe, we also agree that it can and should be incorporated in our classrooms as a means to facilitate our students’ learning. And, yet, sometimes it is tempting to employ technology in the classroom in a way that foregrounds the technology (instead of students’ learning) and that renders it an end in itself. The question I would like to pursue in our discussion is how we can avoid this temptation or trap, or if we even should. How can we make use of technology in 21st-century college classrooms in a way that draws on its unique potential in facilitating learning? How much technology is too much? Should we use certain tools only because our students do? Or should we deliberately offer students alternative (offline) ways of working and learning they don’t encounter outside of the classroom?


Digital Literacy

This break-out group is for those interested in student cognitive preparedness (e.g. ability to learn how to learn when a new technology is introduced in a learning situation; developed skills to make use of the technology seemless) and the psychological aspects of the learner. Who are these “digital natives”? What are the skill sets of individuals participating in higher education? How do they interface with digital tools in their daily lives, and in classrooms? What skills are students bringing to assignments in the class? How should their skill sets inform us about what technology we use and what pedagogical decisions we should make?


Access to Higher Education and Technology for Humanities College Classrooms

Who is already represented in higher education - in research institutions, in liberal arts colleges, in two-year colleges? How can we, within the academy, encourage and broaden access to higher education for diverse, and low-income communities? Can mentors that have come through two-year colleges motivate current college students to continue higher education? What are the differences in skill sets, experience, culture, digital literacy, and access to technology that we must account for in creating student-centered pedagogies?  


Any other subject you want!

If there’s something else you don’t see represented here that you’d like to have a break-out discussion on, we can create one.

Speakers
avatar for Grant Glass

Grant Glass

PhD Student, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
avatar for Sandra Niethardt

Sandra Niethardt

PhD Candidate, Duke University / UNC Chapel Hill
avatar for Seung Yu

Seung Yu

UNC-Chapel Hill
I am a graduate student at UNC-Chapel Hill in educational psychology at the School of Education. I am interested in higher order thinking, its nature and measurement, and how it varies in different disciplines. I frame higher order thinking in terms of self-regulated learning processes (like planning and performance monitoring) and epistemic cognition (which has to do with the acquisition and evaluation of knowledge). My research methodology... Read More →


Friday May 13, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

2:30pm

Teaching Intersectionality through Critical Game Design
In teaching a class on feminist praxis, it can be challenging to present the concept of “intersectionality” or the interlocking systems of oppression, which produce and maintain cultures of domination without flattening out the real hierarchies and privileges that exist or, in turn, essentializing identity. In this workshop, we offer an exercise of critical design on diversity that challenges participants to create a game on “intersectionality,” which helps participants understand how systems operate in tandem to oppress (encourage “othering” and discrimination) or, conversely, when disassembled, to liberate (by fostering community and activism). This heuristic exercise is intended as a tool for teachers to bring into the classroom and as a learning experience for students to understand the complexity of systems of power. In setting up the exercise, we briefly discuss its use in a Spring 2016 class on feminist media.

The roadmap for the workshop includes an introduction on how games might provide us with new insights into models of structural oppression as well as the possibilities for imagining counter publics. Participants will be given a tool kit outlining basic elements of game design with attention to building systems of mechanics and shaping player experience goals. In groups, they will be asked to identify two areas or systems of power and to explore how these vectors intersect. Based on their selection and conversation, groups will do a rapid prototype for a game that illuminates how the system reinforces the power dynamics or inverts the system so that alliances rather than hierarchies and inequalities are formed. Extended time will be given to play testing each of the groups’ design as well as well as a closing feedback session.

Crenshaw, Kimberlé. "Demarginalizing the intersection of race and sex: A black feminist critique of antidiscrimination doctrine, feminist theory and antiracist politics." U. Chi. Legal F. (1989): 139.

Flanagan, Mary, and Helen Nissenbaum. Values at Play in Digital Games. 1 edition. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2014. Print.


Friday May 13, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

2:30pm

Coding Diversity, Diversities of Code: Reading and Rewriting Leadership in Technology and Computer Science
Coding Diversity, Diversities of Code presents the methods, processes, and preliminary findings of our ongoing investigations into the explicit and implicit rhetoric of the global conversation on inclusion and diversity in technology fields and professions. In this study, we examine current (2015 -2016) web documents addressing diversity among post-secondary computer science faculty and technology professionals in the United States, as compiled in two primary data sets: a) individual pieces of long- and short-form online journalism on the subject and b) social media texts produced by self-identified computer science and technology professionals from underrepresented groups, including active tech bloggers and hobbyists. Through a combination of close readings of individual texts; analytics including sentiment analysis, text clustering, and lexical analysis; and visualizations, we seek to reveal features of these texts’ vocabularies, rhetorical and affective strategies, and semantic patterns. We will remain alert to any evidence of potential conscious and unconscious bias, relationships, or patterns within and between the corpora.

Building a more effective, diverse, egalitarian culture in computer science and technology is a long game, requiring lasting interventions at every level of education and culture. Our cross-disciplinary team is committed to this purpose and to serving the academic and professional communities through research projects that result in utility beyond their present purposes: in this case, effective, reusable, publicly available code, data, methods, and documentation. Through the lenses of our individual disciplinary approaches—and their convergence on our shared research subject—we provide novel perspectives on the structures underlying the cultural discourse on diversity in technology and a useful case study of a conscious collaboration between computational and humanistic research methods. We hope that the methods and tools we develop in the process will empower others to undertake their own investigations.


Friday May 13, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

2:30pm

Visualizing Biodesign : Transforming Research Through Interactive Technology
In the 21st century, “bioinspired” solutions are crucial for innovating our future (Myers, 2012). Some “bioinspired” alternatives include vaccine and medicine revolution; technologies to identify and eliminate contaminants from the environment; and nanotechnology for biomedicine diagnostic, and environmental safety (ASU Biodesign Institute, 2015). We propose an interactive technology called “Neosphere” to visualize scientific findings while creating a connection between biological research performed at the laboratory and media. This interactive media tool can increase learning, our ability to explore scientific jargon, and can also establish positive experiences through feedback (Hoffman and Novak, 1995). Hence and based on interactions between media and user characteristics, the use of this media indirectly influences the perceived benefits of searching different types of information, (Klein, 1998). In this project, we evaluate and discuss the potential of interactive media towards advancing the public awareness of environmental biotechnology research. Our interactive media, Neosphere, is made of three different components. First, “the green mission”, a strategic planning game that introduces the players to the concept of phytoremediation, the way in which scientists manage specific plants to remove pollutants such as metal compounds, pesticides, solvents, and crude oil from the environment. Second, “the uranium fighter”, a physical - digital interactive game that immerse the players into the process of uranium contamination by giving players chance to be bacteria destroying uranium concentrations in water. And third, “the Eco DNA art project”, an interactive art piece that visualizes microbial communities contributing in several environmental remediation processes.


Friday May 13, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR 186 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 186

2:30pm

Fostering and Flourishing: Collaborative Digital Research & Teaching between Faculty and Undergraduates
Digital Humanities have expanded methods and forms for scholarship, increasing opportunities for participation and funding for those in the academy. While alt-ac (alternative academic) staff, faculty, and graduate student collaborations have been an oft-discussed topic in higher education journalism and at academic conferences, collaborations with undergraduate students have received less attention. This panel brings together faculty, academic staff, and undergraduate students from a range of disciplines (English, Education, Mathematics, Public Health) and institutions -- private, public, religious, and Hispanic Serving institutions -- to present short papers and facilitate a working session on faculty-student partnerships in research, pedagogy, and community-based activism. Panelists will explore the value of and obstacles to collaborative partnerships between faculty and undergraduates.
Anne Choi (CSU Dominguez Hills) will share a case study of a digital humanities project, "Recreating the Aloha Spirit", undertaken at a medium-sized state university, and the process by which students become experts through learning digital tools. Anne Cong-Huyen (Digital Scholar, Whittier College) and Sofia Duenas (Junior, Whittier College, HASTAC Scholar) will speak about their work in designing a new course that interrogates gender and race in digital labor, and incorporates digital assignments and activities to reinforce the content. Annemarie Perez (Loyola Marymount University) will discuss of the creation of a digital archive on The Chican@ Gothic. This public humanities project allows students to hone their digital writing skills while prompting conversations between the students authors and critics, both in person and via digital means. Lastly, Andrea Rehn (Whittier College) and Bill Kronholm (Whittier College) will speak about an experimental team-taught undergraduate project-based learning course titled “Just Hacking.” In this course, undergraduates with a wide variety of disciplinary backgrounds worked together on a project they titled “Operation F.I.S.H.” (food insecurity and stigmatized homelessness) that advanced from initial conception through prototype during a single semester.


Friday May 13, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

4:00pm

Narratives, Storytelling, and Audience in the Age of the Podcast
This short paper session will feature 4 panelist, Robert Cassanello, Yelena Kalinsky, Cody Mejeur, and Reema Wahab Barlaskar. Each panelist will present a short paper that examines the ways in which podcasting or podcasts incorporate digital storytelling and construct narratives. The panelists will examine podcasting narratives as producers of original content, subscribers of podcasts as well as teachers who utilize podcasting as a tool in the classroom.
Robert Cassanello produces the podcast A History of Central Florida with his students at the University of Central Florida. He will examine the ways in which their podcasts created community based research narratives to explore local history.
Yelena Kalinsky produces the Art of the Review Podcast with H-Net, She will discuss the experience of crafting a non-narrative weekly podcast on an academic topic. She will cover the tools, workflow with a long-distance collaborator, the process of coming up with individual episode ideas and thinking of a long-term arc for the series as a whole to create a narrative thread from episode to episode.
Cody Mejeur will examine game narrative. This presentation will challenge this trend in the study of game narrative by exploring gaming podcasts, Twitch streams, and Let’s Play videos (YouTube recordings of game play-throughs) as collective narratives. By looking at the collective narratives around games in various media, this presentation will advocate new ways of analyzing game narrative that can account for shared and divergent player experiences in games.
Reema Wahab Barlaskar examines the advantages of incorporating podcasts in the literature classroom. Through podcasting, students work together to construct monthly audio-blogs that record, edit, and publish their reflective response for an academic audience. By engaging with poetic texts through an auditory medium, podcasts not only permit opportunities for creative interpretation and analysis but also promote collaborative publishing. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of podcasting as a pedagogical tool in its ability to engage the reading of poetry as a shared experience.


Friday May 13, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:00pm

Critical Design, Deviant Critique
While a significant amount of digital studies research focuses on the intricacies of encoding, preserving, and expressing data, less attention has been paid to questions of design, including the roles that situated knowledge and social relations play in the production of new media projects. With a bias toward critical design (Dunne and Raby n.d.; DiSalvo 2009; Balsamo 2011), this birds of a feather session will begin with a series of presentations followed by an open discussion about why critical design matters, for whom, and in what contexts. Emphasis will be placed on the intersections of critical design with forms of critique that deviate from entrenched articulations of data and digital work in our current moment. Knight will address the absence of critical design in consumer-driven developments in wearable technology, considering projects such as PeriodShare, which broadcasts menstruation information to one’s social network, and Rokudenashiko’s “vagina selfie” project, where Rokudenashiko distributed 3-d design files for her anatomy, as counter-examples. Ray Murray will extend conceptualisations that assume an inextricablity of form and content to include making in different cultural contexts, looking at South Asia as a specific example to demonstrate how Indian design practices and cultures of making, while having some points of contact with such praxis elsewhere, are uniquely forged by historical, institutional and economic circumstances. Sayers will outline ways of intertwining critical design methodologies with rapid prototyping techniques in laboratory contexts, highlighting ways of prototyping that brush against hobbyist celebrations of fabrication technologies typically witnessed within popular maker culture. Finally, Wernimont will report on the technical and interactive work currently being done for the “Safe Harbor” project, which uses haptics (vibrotactile perception) and sonification to not only articulate insights about the related California Eugenics Archive project but also explore how critical design offers new affordances in working with sensitive data. Collectively, these talks will ask how critique happens within design practice, and they will prompt the audience to share their own perspectives on how critical design should happen.


Friday May 13, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

4:00pm

New Institutional Configurations: Community Colleges and Doctoral Training in the Humanities
Community colleges and doctoral programs are not frequently thought of as partners, but as two new collaborative programs funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation show, together they can strengthen and amplify their missions and support a vision of equity and diversity in higher education. The "new majority" of college students are more racially and ethnically diverse than ever before, predominantly low-income, often the first in their families to attend college—and most are enrolled in community colleges. How does this new demographic landscape affect what should doctoral study in the humanities look like?

This session convenes representatives from the two programs, which are partnerships between the City University of New York’s Graduate Center and LaGuardia Community College, and the University of Washington and the Seattle Colleges, respectively. Both support doctoral students in teaching increasingly diverse student populations while simultaneously broadening and strengthening access to and opportunity in the humanities for undergraduates. Program administrators will describe the structures of the partnerships, giving particular attention to the ways in which the two initiatives resonate with one another and the national landscape of graduate education reform. Doctoral students currently involved in cross-institutional teaching and research will present reflections on the value of the community college as a site of professional development and offer recommendations toward building sustained and productive exchanges between two-year and four-year colleges. All will work together to facilitate a roundtable discussion and field questions and input from audience members; we will directly invite humanities faculty from Scottsdale and Mesa Community Colleges, whose campuses are adjacent to the main conference location at Arizona State University, to attend the session.


Friday May 13, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

4:00pm

Opening up Embodied Pedagogy: Movement and Accessibility in the Classroom
Embodied pedagogy is not a phrase one hears often enough, but its basic principles are at the core of my teaching practice. You might have your own definition, but mine centers on putting the reality of the body back into the classroom, encouraging students to move around and to be IN their bodies even as they're in their minds and introducing movement, breathing, meditation, and power poses into the educational environment. In this workshop, I'll begin by explaining and demoing some of these techniques, from power poses to Samuel Delany's raised hand exercise, and give some examples of how they've positively affected my classroom's environment.

I'd like most of the session to be idea-sharing, though - what do YOU do in your classroom? How do you respect students' preferences, physical abilities, and/or range of motion while offering embodiment activities? What are some Universal Design embodiment activities that students of all (dis)abilities could benefit from?

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

5:30pm

Evening Reception with MLA Connected Academics
As light hors d'oeuvres will be provided, please RSVP to the reception at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1guL8MrYqs8_6dpKlqvhKIsM1vQIMePFPSCvXQc0A3NI/viewform

Friday May 13, 2016 5:30pm - 7:30pm
Pitchforks n' Corks 660 South College Avenue, Tempe AZ 85281

8:00pm

H-Net Reception
Join Robert Cassanello, VP for Research and Publications, and Yelena Kalinsky, Associate Director and Managing Editor of Reviews, to learn more and ask questions.

Save the attached image and receive one free drink on us. (one free beer, wine, or cocktail up to $8 per person) 


Friday May 13, 2016 8:00pm - 10:00pm
Tapacubo 225 East Apache Boulevard
 
Saturday, May 14
 

9:00am

Post-Conference Workshop: Stories from Data
Speakers

Saturday May 14, 2016 9:00am - 2:00pm
Nexus Lab, COOR 5519 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281

9:00am