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Thursday, May 12
 

10:30am

Achives Alive: Activating the North Carolina Jukebox
The North Carolina Jukebox project transforms an inaccessible audio archive of historic North Carolina folk music into a vital, publicly accessible digital archive and museum exhibition. In the 1930s Frank Clyde Brown, a Duke scholar, began recording and archiving Western North Carolina folk music. Most of those recordings are still housed on wax cylinders and glass disks in the Duke Libraries, but about 400 songs have been converted to digital formats. Scholars in music and folklore, librarians, students, digital media specialists, descendants of the original performers, and contemporary musicians are working together to bring the collection to life.

As a digital cultural heritage project, NC jukebox provokes critical questions around authority, appropriation, and control of cultural artifacts preserved in wax and glass. At the same time, it opens up a possibility-space for ongoing academic and community collaboration around a living set of traditions and practices. The project includes an exhibition and online playlist of the “Greatest Hits” of the FCB collection. It also necessitates metadata standards and library infrastructure. We are exhibiting both in the Mountain Music Museum, operated by folk singer/musicians Terry and Ruth McKinney, and in the Rubenstein Library at Duke in time for the annual meeting of the Music Librarians Association.

In addition to foregrounding the music itself, NC Jukebox explores biographies of the singers, transcribe the songs, and traces the Scotch-English history and contemporary analogues of the songs themselves. We demonstrate change over time and space through maps, patterns, flows, timelines, and networks of the music – a kind of distant listening, or viewing. Interactive touchscreens, period photos, and hybrid analog-digital audio playback machines – a radio, a Jukebox, and perhaps a 78-playing phonograph – will invoke the historical conditions of production and reception. We also confront the history and limits of the songcatching enterprise itself. Brown’s posthumous editors left out African American singers and songs, among others, leading us to consider together how to move from cultural heritage as univocal essence to polyphonic, multimodal assemblage.

Speakers


Thursday May 12, 2016 10:30am - 10:45am
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

10:45am

A Social History of Water Rights: Digitizing the Los Angeles Aqueduct

The Los Angeles Aqueduct is central to understanding the history of modern Los Angeles and battles over water scarcity in the region. Dating back to its construction in 1913, the aqueduct has been both a source of controversy and an engine for population growth in Los Angeles. The aqueduct’s history is rife with questions over political power, water rights, Native American sovereignty, and environmental degradation. From 2013-2015, the UCLA Library and Metabolic Studio aimed to capture the complexity of the aqueduct’s history with the creation of the Los Angeles Aqueduct Digital Platform (LAADP). Designed as both an archive and a source of scholarship, the website houses over 2,000 archival materials that have been digitized and a scholarship section that hosts dozens of contributions from UCLA students.

This paper will be centered on the platform’s capstone project. I was hired to work with a team of undergraduate students to produce a series of original pieces for the scholarship section using digital humanities tools. We decided to focus on groups that have been adversely affected by the aqueduct’s construction and produce a social history of the aqueduct. The five pieces we produced looked at a variety of issues ranging from the history of Paiute natives in the region to contemporary concerns over dust pollution in the Owens Valley. Using long-form narrative, GIS, data visualizations, and a host of other tools, we were able to creatively reimagine various facets of the aqueduct’s history. Building on previous works of digital history, this project looked to situate the aqueduct as an evolving, contested space that has been reinterpreted by different generations of Californians. I will argue that the LAADP serves as a model for producing digital history projects that address a multifaceted topic while also fostering student research on issues of both contemporary and historical importance.


Speakers


Thursday May 12, 2016 10:45am - 11:00am
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

11:00am

Digital East St. Louis
This presentation will share work underway with Digital East St. Louis, a project funded by a National Science Foundation Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers grant. Housed at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, the project is a collaboration between the Science Technology and Math Center, the Interdisciplinary Research and Scholarship Center (SIUE’s digital humanities Center), and the East St. Louis Community. Faculty in English and History who specialize in the digital humanities work alongside middle school teachers in the East St. Louis school district to develop a comprehensive three-year summer and after-school program for a group of middle school students. The research component of Digital East St. Louis is assessing how a digital humanities, place-based approach inspires student interest in the computer sciences. Over the three-year program, which launched in the summer of 2015, students will build a comprehensive database and a content-rich digital map showcasing their research into the history and culture of the city and its inhabitants.

One of the project’s primary goals is to encourage students to think across disciplines about ecology, geography, the lived environment, history, literature, and culture. Students will use skills central to information technology and information literacy to draw linkages between these topics, which will expand their critical thinking abilities and encourage them to see technology as a tool for exploring and visualizing broader questions. The project plans to train students in photography as they learn about East St. Louis architecture, learn about video production as they conduct oral history interviews with East St. Louis residents, and develop skills in research and metadata as they develop their own research interests for the project. This presentation will highlight the projects’ progress and discuss how to develop successful collaborations between the fields of STEM and the digital humanities in informal K-12 learning environments.



Thursday May 12, 2016 11:00am - 11:15am
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

11:15am

Innovation in Museum Making: The Museum of Fictional Literary Artifacts
Fictional objects, like characters, linger with readers in ways similar to material ones. Marketers recognize the pull of these objects, offering physical versions such as the necklace worn by Rose in Titanic or the light-sabres whipped around by characters in Star Wars. What became of the piano in D.H. Lawrence’s poem? The portrait of Dorian Gray? Dracula’s wooden stake? Our museum collects these objects and represents them with photos, explanatory notes, context, and provenance. Where was the object originally, and how did we get it?

The objects chosen to serve in a fictional work are remarkable. Material objects, and the effort to control them, own them, manipulate them, and leave them behind, help to catapult plots and develop characters. The novel Huckleberry Finn, for example, leaves behind a boot with a crossed heel, a bloody saw dabbed with hair, a hairball, a girl’s dress, and a bullet on a string. Just to name a few. Imagine the collection of girl’s dresses that might appear in a museum of this type. Or the knives, daggers, axes, spears, and penknives that sit side by side for comparison.

John Nelson, Professor of English for New Media, and Stacey Berry, Associate Professor of English for New Media will discuss The Museum of Fictional Literary Artifacts (http://mfla.omeka.net/), a digital thematic research collection they are currently developing at Dakota State University. The site provides students and scholars, in any level or field, the humanistic and technological experience in writing, collecting, editing and thinking critically about material artifacts in fictional (and real) worlds. Gathering hundreds of fictional items--from diverse works and from many periods and genres into one searchable database--allows us to consider these fictional artifacts--and their sources--in entirely new ways.


Thursday May 12, 2016 11:15am - 11:30am
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

11:45am

Hacking the Academy: Hacktivism, Makerspaces, and DH
Makerspaces (a.k.a. hackerspaces, fablabs) are collaborative sites for experimentation, collaboration, and creativity. As experiential learning sites, makerspaces support the development of multiple literacies while also introducing students to the principles of design thinking. This interactive workshop will introduce the suite of tools selected for the Mobile DH Makerspace being developed at the University of Iowa School of Library and Information Science, including littleBits building kits and Arduino microcontrollers . These tools were purposefully selected for their mobility, accessibility, and affordability. Each of these factors makes it easy to implement and build devices in unconventional venues.

In this workshop, participants will build a “hacktivist” device. As concerns over internet privacy and security increase, educators have become more and more concerned with training students to think critically about their digital presence, particularly through internet activism. As Elizabeth Losh notes, “Outright electronic civil disobedience could be described as the most militant form of political resistance in the digital humanities and one that has become more visible in panels and professional associations in recent years.” Although many academics discuss the need for hacktivism, few offer models for doing so. Adopting this approach, participants in this interactive session will work in teams to explore the capabilities of these tools and develop a working prototype while exploring the pedagogical approaches to incorporating these tools and critical technological literacy into the DH classroom.

Together the littleBits and Arduino scaffold to develop users’ confidence in coding, building, project management, and digital literacy. Designed to foster critical engagement and activism in undergraduate and graduate classrooms, across campuses, and in communities, this workshop emphasizes the ways in which individuals can simply and effectively engage in civil disobedience through the use of digital tools.


Thursday May 12, 2016 11:45am - 12:45pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

1:00pm

An Archive of One’s Own: The Radical Possibilities of the Digital Database
Advances in digitally networked technologies, combined with increasingly plentiful space for electronic storage have resulted in an expansion of opportunities for archiving cultural artifacts. The ability to create digital media and to digitize analogue media democratizes the role of the archivist and allows new opportunities for collaboration and, in so doing, highlights the underlying value systems that have informed digitization and preservation efforts to date. In place of a few official archives, copious personal and participatory archives have arisen, collections that are characterized by a more diverse content base, a realignment of knowledge objects, and a reimagining of the connections among and between them.

The clear delineation between data and metadata, for instance, is called into question with the recognition that context, in many ways, dictates meaning. So too the boundary of any single archive is increasingly in flux as each exists in a larger online network. Moreover the fixedness of a single artifact becomes destabilized as digital copies, failing to exhaust the original, result in potentially limitless replicas. In this media landscape then, discoverability is a key issue when considering archival practices. Do digital spaces merely amplify those voices that are already heard loudly and clearly? What sort of stewardship issues prevail in a network controlled by the private sector? And how might considering all such issues help us to reimagine other knowledge objects (the memoir, the monograph), as well as structures of knowledge (the edited anthology, the university-held collection) in order that their buried assumptions might be openly scrutinized and evaluated?

The four presentations (long papers) in this panel tackle such questions, using a current project to illuminate aspects of contemporary archives and archival practices in all of their rich diversity.

Speakers
avatar for Caitlin Fisher

Caitlin Fisher

Director, Augmented Reality Lab, York University
Caitlin directs the Augmented Reality Lab at York University where she held the Canada Research Chair in Digital Culture for the past decade. A 2013 Fulbright Chair, she is the recipient of many international awards for digital storytelling including the Electronic Literature Award for Fiction and the Vinaròs Prize for her AR poetry. Caitlin serves on the international Board of Directors for both the Electronic Literature Organization and... Read More →


Thursday May 12, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

2:30pm

Disrupting the Archive: Multi-media approaches to Latina/os and Eugenic Sterilization in 20th century California
Over 60,000 people were sterilized in the United States during the 20th century under eugenic laws in 32 states. California led the nation in eugenic sterilizations performing over 20,000, or one-third of the total sterilizations, on patients in state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane.” Through a collaborative project called Eugenic Rubicon: An Interactive Archive of Sterilization in 20th Century California, Drs. Lira, Wernimont, and Stern seek to make the history of eugenic sterilization in California visible, accessible, and interactive through the use of digital platforms, big data analysis, data visualization, and interpretative devices. Our project draws from a one-of-a-kind archive of close to 20,000 patient sterilization records from California institutions from the period 1919-1952. In this panel we will share our efforts to integrate questions of race, gender, sexuality and the particular experiences of Latina/o patients in meaningful and transformative ways. We will preview our web platform, present demographic and statistical analysis related to Latina/o patient records, and “perform the archive” through interactive sonic and haptic interpretations of data. Within new media studies and digital humanities, haptics (vibrotactile perception) and sonics have emerged as important ways of knowing and draw attention to the affective dimensions of computational and archival work. Our panel is deliberately promiscuous with respect to disciplines and practices, entangling distinct modes and methods of scholarship and artistic practice to transgress disciplinary boundaries. We seek to create new digital and multi-sensorial ways of embodying, conveying, and humanizing lived experiences of Latina/os subjected to multiple forms of bodily and bureaucratic erasure.

Beyond sharing research on Latina/o patients’ experiences of sterilization in California institutions during the 1920s-1950s, this panel seeks to engage the panelists, respondents, and audience in questions related to multi-media and multi-sensorial approaches to historical archives, the role of digital humanities in Latina/o Studies, and how to responsibly share the personal stories of Latina/o patients whose lives and bodies were violated by the state.


Thursday May 12, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:00pm

Footprints of PR in the News: Investigating Patterns of Text Reuse
This interdisciplinary project combines methods from computer science and computational linguistics with manual content analysis to address the issue of news media reliance on content supplied by public relations sources - a topic that has been prominent in media studies for many decades.

Studies going back as far as the early 20th century have reported that a considerable percentage of newspaper content had originated as publicity. Such content was never impartial: the use of adverbs and adjectives favoring the client went hand in hand with presenting the story from a client's perspective, thus, in the words of Walter Lippmann (1922), painting a picture “the publicity man” wished the public to see. Recent scholarship has consistently pointed to the same issues, raising concerns over media serving the needs of the PR industry instead of serving the public.

Most of the studies addressing this topic cite evidence of anecdotal nature or fail to demonstrate a relationship between the source and the resulting coverage. This limitation is methodological and is explained by the scope of the required data analysis. To address this limitation, a pilot study was conducted that used computation to collect 6,171 press releases and 48,664 potentially related articles and identify all instances of text reuse. Although the results suggested that the extent of media's reliance on publicity sources has been exaggerated, computational analysis also revealed a striking example of PR influence, which called for further investigation.

This project focuses on computationally exploring the discovered instances of text reuse in terms of language, sentiment, and overall themes, with a particular focus on quotations - a staple of any press release. The results will be available as an online visualization tool enabling the user to interactively explore the data, visualize patterns of text reuse, as well as language patterns in press releases.


Thursday May 12, 2016 4:00pm - 4:05pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:05pm

Defaced: Biometric Facial Recognition and the Queer Politics of Escape
Biometric devices use physiological characteristics such as fingerprints, palm veins and prints, face recognition, DNA, iris and retina recognition, and scent to identify individuals and groups. This data is often collected from consumers and citizens by retailers and government agencies with the promise of fast, easy, and flexible access to personal networks, products, and information.

As a result of the collection of this data, biometric devices have the ability to identify individuals on the basis of race, gender, and sexual orientation. The identificatory practices on which biometric data rely upon to function are stable and normative. Identity, however, is not static, and nuance often leads to the failure of biometric devices to process biometric data and produce coherent results. This incoherence speaks to the inevitable inability to account for the complexity of personal identity, and it begs us to question the extent to which we are willing to allow biometric data to speak for us.

This paper situates itself at this moment of failure and considers the ways in which practices of “defacement” and intelligibility might be more desirable than visibility and recognition. Specifically, this work examines the critical intervention made by contemporary artists such as Zach Blas whose Facial Weaponiztion Suite positions escape as more than a desire to exit current regimes of control, but also as a way to cultivate forms of living otherwise. Escape, Blas argues “is a collective attempt—aesthetic, conceptual, political—to eradicate forms of control, exploitation, and domination, which just might make the world more hospitable to all” (rhizome.org).

This project asks timely and important questions regarding the impact of surveillance on civil and human rights. Its position at the intersection of the arts and sciences encourages critical reflection upon the role of biometric technology in everyday lived experiences, and highlights the important role the arts play in the development of science and technology.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 4:05pm - 4:10pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:10pm

#writersofinstagram: An Online Affinity Space for Visual Writing
Online spaces allow people to participate in diverse experiences that connect them with other like-minded people, across the country and around the world. These connected experiences allow not only for the construction of communities, but also for the construction of relationships that allow for exploration of identity and the creation of ties. Instagram is a mobile social network that privileges image over text: posts on Instagram must include an image with text being optional. Organizing hashtags and content creation tools allow for the formation of affinity spaces on Instagram. Here, I focus on the affinity space created around #writersofinstagram and how it serves as a space for passionate users to discuss their own and others’ writings. Affinity spaces are either physical or virtual spaces in which people can come together around a shared passion (Gee, 2005). Affinity spaces must offer not only a shared space for communication, but also a space to create and display content. Accordingly, Instagram provides a unique mixture of visual and textual space that is being used by the #writersofinstagram community to create, share and discuss user created pieces of writing. In addition, the #writersofinstagram community and the relationships formed within it provide a space for personal learning and growth centered around a passionate pursuit as well as the opportunity for individuals to progress from novices to experts within the space. Understanding the motivations behind posts within the #writersofinstagram affinity space can provide insight into the changing practices of digital writers and creators of multimodal texts. By learning more about the nature of writing affinity spaces online, we can then begin to understand why users choose to post and share text in visual spaces. Looking at understanding the purposes and products of those posting to the #writersofinstagram space can also help researchers interested in the way writing is changing in the digital age to understand how process of composition is evolving and growing.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 4:10pm - 4:15pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:15pm

Identity & Representation in Student Documentaries: Stories of Concern and Hope
Identity and representation, especially in regards to gender, sexuality, and race, are current national conversations that are necessary to bring into the classroom, but must be done so in a safe way. This 5 minute short paper will discuss one digital method to have students lead and navigate these complex issues in conversations. Based off of Halbritter’s (2013) Mics, Cameras, Symbolic Action, Halbritter and Lindquist’s (2012) article “Time, Lives, and Videotape: Operationalizing Discovery in Scenes of Literacy Sponsorship,” Weiner’s (1986) article “Collaborative Learning in the Classroom: A Guide to Evaluation,” and Bruffee’s (1984) article “Collaborative Learning and the ‘Conversation of Mankind,” I will read findings from two student lead documentary projects from Michigan State University’s Advanced Multimedia Writing - one on racial identities being portrayed in the media and the second on gender identities being constructed by their surrounding spaces. These students brought these conversations into the classroom by choice and through an art medium, which enabled them to have creative freedom and agency to offer messages of hurt and optimism for injustices to change. I see this work as one method to have important conversations. In addition, I question how this approach can be furthered. For instance: in what ways can professors allow students to lead conversations on local communities, national conversations, or worldwide systems through digital spaces? How can we facilitate an interdisciplinary approach to complex problems in order to converse with students on potential solutions?

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 4:15pm - 4:20pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:20pm

The Potential of the Past: Walking Through the Creation of an Open Access Collection of Faculty-Produced Holocaust Site Photographs
University libraries are often called upon when faculty are ready to part with their book collections and/or their research data. This paper presents one such case, when Professor Emeritus Duane Mezga of the Landscape Architecture Program approached the library, along with a three-ring binder full of Kodachrome 64 color slides.

The photographs were taken by Professor Mezga in the early 1990s using the progressive realization technique, which captures the experience of walking through a site. Twenty-one sites in total, including concentration camps and killing centers, transit points, and other historically significant sites in Europe were photographed. Memorials present at these sites were documented. Potential in these slides was seen by the subject librarian, and cooperation with the digital curation unit led to the digitization of the slides.

The Duane Mezga Holocaust Site Photography collection is built using a free and open source (FOSS) technology stack utilizing Fedora Commons, Apache Solr, and Drupal CMS (Islandora). Metadata is deliberately foregrounded in the repository architecture: the primary navigation interface is an interactive map built in CartoDB which utilizes geocoded metadata fields to place significant sites from the photographs onto a map — clicking on the site will execute a search on that location. Additionally, because the actual XML data are indexed, searching metadata is divorced from the limitations of the traditional database structure and is amplified by the additional functionality of an enterprise indexing system including string manipulations, stemming, wildcards, highlighting, proximity searching and faceting among other features.

The Holocaust Site collection website will be launched this academic year. With the enormous changes in the political and physical landscape which occurred with the fall of the Soviet Union, and the development of new memorials and museums at these sites, the potential use of the collection is wide. This locally-produced open access collection will provide a new avenue for exploring change over time, for the production of new knowledge across disciplines and geography, and for further conversation on war, landscape, and memorialization.


Thursday May 12, 2016 4:20pm - 4:25pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:25pm

Fugitive Archiving: Ephemera and Community Expressions
Archival tradition is based on colonial power dynamics that surround exclusive histories with “negative space,” leaving those whose histories are excluded to perform their own archival scenarios using ephemeral materials and expressions. Community is a theme connecting many histories constructed in these dynamic ways because communities are entities of action with fluid boundaries, making their histories ill-suited for traditional archiving. In this dissertation work I recognize communities’ dynamic expressions as history construction and study ephemera as residues of these expressions, because community histories warrant archival inclusion and because such inclusion supports the archival profession’s relevance in increasingly dynamic information landscapes. My work here is grounded in archival scholarship by Bastian (2003) around “communities of records” that has ignited new interest in communities’ embodied expressions, albeit with questions remaining around how we can include embodied expressions in archival practice. I use communities of records as a starting point, and propose the study of ephemera – reenvisioned through the lens of performance studies - is one method of archiving around communities. Through this reenvisioning lens I study one case of dynamic history construction around a community event: The All Souls Procession of Tucson, Arizona, a massive grassroots parade in honor of the dead now in its 25th year. I conduct qualitative analysis of ephemeral history construction in this community event, from which I draw themes and strategies for evoking commemoration in community settings. Through this study of dynamic history construction, I hope to offer archival science a new conceptualization of ephemera as an archival directive, to include embodied expressions in archival practice, build more inclusive histories, and help archivists form more vital relationships with dynamic communities and disciplines.
Bastian, J. A. (2003). Owning memory: how a Caribbean community lost its archives and found its history (No. 99). Libraries Unlimited.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 4:25pm - 4:30pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:30pm

Softwares, Histories, Memories and Archives
I propose to think with the audience about this question: How can software be written to pay attention to listening, a crucial component of engagement with testimonies and memories?

As a scholar-practitioner, my work is an example of thinking with theoretical/academic spheres as well as with technical/practical spheres across narrative intelligence, software studies and digital humanities. I intend to address this question through my project titled We Are History.

In pursuit of generating communal dialogue in the context of inability to have conversations about our contested history in Lebanon, I set out to build an Artificial Agent that would sift through an oral history video archive of testimonies of daily life with the task of figuring out common threads, sometimes confirming and sometimes contesting each other, and automatically editing many different versions of possible histories. This automatic montage machine addresses two problems in the Lebanese context: first, it circumvents the tiring accusation of being biased since a machine is now the moderator (presenting a multiplicity of stories might be the closest one can get to strategic objectivity) and second, it opens up the possibility of conversation by weaving various and often opposing perspectives in order to start imagining what our histories could look like. The project, which would reside online as well as in booths in public spaces across Lebanon, invites people to listen to an automated montage of oral histories and to then share their own stories and memories. Each newly contributed story is instantly added to the archive, analyzed using new developments in computational corpus-based linguistics, automatic story generation, and social computing and tagged with its transcript which enables the interface to incorporate newly added video interviews into the pool concerning the event discussed, thereby changing the version of history previously compiled.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 4:30pm - 4:35pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:40pm

Digital Poetics of Democracy:
Is there a digital poetics of democracy? How has Twitter changed the political rhetoric of nations such as Spain, Portugal, and Greece, that have seen the emergence of new, digitally-centered grassroots political parties? How does Twitter produce a new language of power and opposition? This talk analyzes Twitter data from Spain’s Podemos and Ciudadanos, and Portugal's LIVRE! grassroots political parties for their most commonly tweeted parts of speech (verbs, adverbs, adjectives, nouns) and hastags. I will begin with a brief discussion of the very notion of a digital poetics and of Twitter as a form of digital opposition and power, describe how I have used Python and the Stanford Parser to analyze and tag the parts of speech and hashtags from these parties' tweets, and share my findings. The goal of this study is to begin to examine what might be construed as a digital poetics of democracy, power, and opposition in 21st century Spain and Portugal and to consider how this rhetoric differs from that of other, traditional political communications.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 4:40pm - 4:45pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:45pm

To Trump Trump's Wall: Designing a Framework for Participatory, Co-Creative Media and Politcial Design Practice
To Trump Trump’s wall is participatory media art project created in response to Donald Trump’s campaign promise to build a giant wall in the border between Mexico and the United States. In this paper I present a brief contextual review describing Trump’s position in regards of the wall. Next, I delineate the theoretical perspectives and approaches that materialize in a form of practice of co-creative media based on participatory culture and political and adversarial design with my own approach to critical making. This paper presents the results of two iterations of the project, one in the form of a workshop and the other in a gallery setting, and highlights the different outcomes from each setting and audience group. 

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 4:45pm - 4:50pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84
 
Friday, May 13
 

10:45am

Postmortem: critical reflection and creative lessons learned from creating an essay in VR about VR.
Drawing on eight years of humanities work in Brown University’s Cave (VR system), I have been solicited for a critical and creative article on VR by NYT Op docs. The final product would be a reflective piece in VR about VR distributed through the NYT Google cardboard initiative. My written essay will use the methodologies of media archeology and design iteration to talk about society’s cyclical obsession with immersion and the hyped technologies that promise it. It will address the different technologies and epochs of immersion from the advent of the panorama to modern day VR HMDs. Similarities in how these devices are marketed and consumed will be drawn by comparing product descriptions and marketing rhetoric throughout the decades. The reflection will end on the current iteration of VR speculation and ask why we persist in a cultural amnesia of the “immersive” movements that have come before.

The talk at Hastac will present some of my findings in a scholarly light as well as discuss the practical and creative practice of making the VR app that chronicles/documents previous immersive technologies. Some of the sub issues the essay will raise include the dangers of “newness”, the contemporary move to co-opt “storytelling” for marketing practices, and the delicate problem of designing immersive political worlds for the “empathy machine”. I am applying for a paper slot, but suggest a 30-45 minute talk to make room for addressing both the scholarly consequences of this piece and the behind the scenes lessons in immersive design I’ve learned as a practitioner using the Unity Engine. I would also like to bring a few cardboards for hands-on demonstration during the time slot and hope to plan exercise discussion with them and the NYT initiative.

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 10:45am - 11:00am
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

11:00am

The Eliza Effect and Epistemic Fractures in Mixed Reality Interfaces with A.I. Agents
The paper will examine strategies of evoking an affective response in interactions with machinic intelligence presented in visual, textual and mixed reality forms. Particularly, I will consider the effect of psychological mechanisms of projection and recognition in the context of algorithmic procedures in digital simulation and translation. Mixed reality interfaces - where the 'real' embodied reactions are blended with the 'virtual' datascope - seem to be especially relevant material to explore the productive difference between the representational and performative regimes of engagement with data, as well as the role of software in shifting these regimes. I will show how the issues of projection and illusion of reciprocity that were raised already in the 1960s by Joseph Weizenbaum's chat bot Eliza, have sustained though contemporary practices engaging "intelligent agents".

I will base my analysis on several artistic examples: the interactive video installations "Chameleon" by Tina Gonsalves that explore emotional contagion through technologies of facial expression recognition; the net-art project "psychossensation.xyz" by Ubermorgen; and a recent psychotherapy smartphone application, “Karen," by Blast Theory. In each instance, the user is tricked into an eerily personalized interaction with a software-driven, fictionalized character/figure established through text (“phychossensation") and video ("Chameleon", "Karen"). The questions can be intrusive and overly intimate, and the gazes piercing and emotionally disturbing; yet both are generated as a response to the user’s own reactions and behavioral data, e.g. phone usage. The programs, such as "Karen", morphs to fit the user's everyday life, although pushing the legitimate boundaries and conventions of an interaction with a human life-coach. The resultant feeling oscillates between a suspicious "how do they know?" and a desire to explore the limits of one's vulnerability. This is despite (or due to) the knowledge that the conversation happens mostly within oneself, with a productive illusion of an intelligent and sensitive interlocutor. These exchanges feel unsutured, almost natural - or, as natural and honest as the imagined agency on the other side appears to “feel."

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 11:00am - 11:15am
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

11:45am

From Texts to InPhO (and back!)
In this hands on workshop, we will provide an introduction to LDA Topic Modeling using the InPhO Topic Explorer - a new corpus construction and modeling framework made specifically for digital humanists. It features cross-platform support for Windows, Mac, and Linux with a simple single-command installation process. We show how this framework has been used for research on the HathiTrust Digital Library, Darwin's Reading Notebooks, the Old Bailey Online, and the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The Topic Explorer also has the capacity to import any arbitrary collection of PDFs, TEI, and plain-text files. We can show how the process of replicable workflows enables rapid experimentation in the humanities and can enrich exploration by moving from texts to topics and back again.


Friday May 13, 2016 11:45am - 12:45pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

1:00pm

ADAPTability of games to teach digital literacy
Digital literacy and its implications on safety have become necessary skills to develop in our interconnected world. In a professional setting, how journalists communicate with whistleblowers through insecure channels can endanger the lives of the journalist and their source. Yet, these skills are rarely taught at journalism school programs (Columbia University being a notable exception). Lack of these skills can also lead to over sharing of information and physical or emotional danger through online harassment.

In this interactive session, we will demonstrate how ADAPT, a game created by CommunityRED to develop skills for risk assessment, can be used as a pedagogical tool to develop critical skills in digital literacy and digital safety. Participants will take the role of an American journalist working in an repressive environment to learn about secure communication and risk analysis in the digital environment.

We will have specific activities to show how different skills can be gained from the same game. After the demonstration, we will hold a short conversation about the learning goals and efficacy of ADAPT for teaching both hard and soft skills around digital security and digital literacy.


Friday May 13, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

2:30pm

Digital Pedagogy and the Future of Higher Education

Digital Pedagogy and the Future of Higher Education

The Duke PhD Lab Digital Pedagogy working group has been working to document and catalogue ways that people transform traditional pedagogical tools into an experience that is more engaging, and built for the world we live in now. The group has also been compiling reviews and use-cases of digital pedagogical tools. We are also interested in imagining and promoting the best methods for facilitating digital literacy and digital skills, as well as discussing and experimenting with radical pedagogy enhanced or made possible by digital spaces or digital concepts. Join us to discuss ways that we can transform higher education using new tools, techniques and collaborations. Our plan for this birds of a feather session is to break out into small group discussions on the following topics:


Digital and Online Teaching Tools

We would like to have a open discussion and workshopping of ideas around digital tools and how they are and could be used for classroom teaching in higher education. Specifically, those interested in foreign language teaching and/or MOOCs are encouraged to participate in this breakout session.


Open Access to Data and Texts

We can do all sorts of interesting things with digital humanities and while teaching those methods has its own set of challenges, obtaining the data or texts to work with is often times the most difficult aspect to teaching digital humanities. Are we to accept what our library can afford access to or can we think of new ways to gain access to that material. We need to construct or hack a space where he can have our students ask whatever research question they want and not be limited to what we have access to.


Role of Technology in the Classroom

We all might agree that today’s technology offers ways to work and teach we couldn’t imagine were possible fairly recently. Maybe, we also agree that it can and should be incorporated in our classrooms as a means to facilitate our students’ learning. And, yet, sometimes it is tempting to employ technology in the classroom in a way that foregrounds the technology (instead of students’ learning) and that renders it an end in itself. The question I would like to pursue in our discussion is how we can avoid this temptation or trap, or if we even should. How can we make use of technology in 21st-century college classrooms in a way that draws on its unique potential in facilitating learning? How much technology is too much? Should we use certain tools only because our students do? Or should we deliberately offer students alternative (offline) ways of working and learning they don’t encounter outside of the classroom?


Digital Literacy

This break-out group is for those interested in student cognitive preparedness (e.g. ability to learn how to learn when a new technology is introduced in a learning situation; developed skills to make use of the technology seemless) and the psychological aspects of the learner. Who are these “digital natives”? What are the skill sets of individuals participating in higher education? How do they interface with digital tools in their daily lives, and in classrooms? What skills are students bringing to assignments in the class? How should their skill sets inform us about what technology we use and what pedagogical decisions we should make?


Access to Higher Education and Technology for Humanities College Classrooms

Who is already represented in higher education - in research institutions, in liberal arts colleges, in two-year colleges? How can we, within the academy, encourage and broaden access to higher education for diverse, and low-income communities? Can mentors that have come through two-year colleges motivate current college students to continue higher education? What are the differences in skill sets, experience, culture, digital literacy, and access to technology that we must account for in creating student-centered pedagogies?  


Any other subject you want!

If there’s something else you don’t see represented here that you’d like to have a break-out discussion on, we can create one.

Speakers
avatar for Grant Glass

Grant Glass

PhD Student, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
avatar for Sandra Niethardt

Sandra Niethardt

PhD Candidate, Duke University / UNC Chapel Hill
avatar for Seung Yu

Seung Yu

UNC-Chapel Hill
I am a graduate student at UNC-Chapel Hill in educational psychology at the School of Education. I am interested in higher order thinking, its nature and measurement, and how it varies in different disciplines. I frame higher order thinking in terms of self-regulated learning processes (like planning and performance monitoring) and epistemic cognition (which has to do with the acquisition and evaluation of knowledge). My research methodology... Read More →


Friday May 13, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84

4:00pm

Narratives, Storytelling, and Audience in the Age of the Podcast
This short paper session will feature 4 panelist, Robert Cassanello, Yelena Kalinsky, Cody Mejeur, and Reema Wahab Barlaskar. Each panelist will present a short paper that examines the ways in which podcasting or podcasts incorporate digital storytelling and construct narratives. The panelists will examine podcasting narratives as producers of original content, subscribers of podcasts as well as teachers who utilize podcasting as a tool in the classroom.
Robert Cassanello produces the podcast A History of Central Florida with his students at the University of Central Florida. He will examine the ways in which their podcasts created community based research narratives to explore local history.
Yelena Kalinsky produces the Art of the Review Podcast with H-Net, She will discuss the experience of crafting a non-narrative weekly podcast on an academic topic. She will cover the tools, workflow with a long-distance collaborator, the process of coming up with individual episode ideas and thinking of a long-term arc for the series as a whole to create a narrative thread from episode to episode.
Cody Mejeur will examine game narrative. This presentation will challenge this trend in the study of game narrative by exploring gaming podcasts, Twitch streams, and Let’s Play videos (YouTube recordings of game play-throughs) as collective narratives. By looking at the collective narratives around games in various media, this presentation will advocate new ways of analyzing game narrative that can account for shared and divergent player experiences in games.
Reema Wahab Barlaskar examines the advantages of incorporating podcasts in the literature classroom. Through podcasting, students work together to construct monthly audio-blogs that record, edit, and publish their reflective response for an academic audience. By engaging with poetic texts through an auditory medium, podcasts not only permit opportunities for creative interpretation and analysis but also promote collaborative publishing. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of podcasting as a pedagogical tool in its ability to engage the reading of poetry as a shared experience.


Friday May 13, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
COOR L1-84 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-84