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Arts and Media [clear filter]
Thursday, May 12
 

10:30am

Migration, the Refugee crisis and Video Games for Change
The Mediterranean has become one of the deadliest border crossings of the world. While the refugees and asylum seekers migrate en masse and in dire circumstances, the global context of safety shifts in dramatic ways making the migrant crisis an issue that truly matters to contemporary lives of everyone along the way. This paper is a case study of a November 2015 game jam that took place in Istanbul within the context of amberPlatform arts and technology festival where developers and designers had 36 hours to create video games on the theme “göçüyoruz!” (means both “We are going down!” and “We are migrating.”). The participants had already attended a panel on Syrian refugee crisis in Turkey organized in conjuction with the game jam. The result was 6 video and 3 analogue games.

This paper is a case study of the process of creating this game jam –I curated both the panel and the game jam- where code writers and game developers look into a current event through the angle of empathy and political involvement. Can video games really change the world? Can we play with lives, so to speak? While games for social change is already a genre, the scope of this work involved listening to first person accounts from activists, lawyers and refugee artists about the larger questions at hand regarding the day to day lives of migrants, and the point of view of those who are living in bureaucratic limbo in Turkey.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 10:30am - 10:45am
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

10:45am

Speculative Practices as Critical Making: Designing Rituals, Situations, and other Tangible Imaginaries
While both Critical Making (Ratto 2011) and Design Fiction (Bleecker 2009) are techniques that provoke speculation about practices, such psychological “effects” are often treated as epiphenomena of the design object rather than as structured experiences which themselves might be available for creative manipulation. But as scholars from ritual studies will tell us, humans have a long history of designing rituals (Bell 1992; Grimes 1995, Tambiah 1981, Hobsbawm 1992), and we can similarly understand a range of communication practices as the outcome of designerly intervention, including: Roberts Rules of Order, feminist Consciousness Raising conversation groups, AA meetings, couples counseling, and Occupy Human Mic rituals. Indeed, some of the most significant cultural transformations in human history have involved the invention, or creative reimagining, of rituals, situations, and routines. This talk approaches the mechanics of human practice itself as a topic of Critical Making, not only through explicit decisions about material interfaces but also through speculative manipulation of tacit rules of engagement—thus, expanding the notion of “making” to treat the mechanics of practice as if it were a kind of material structure. Rituals, routines, situations, encounters, etc. are all embodied, procedurally structured, and spatiotemporally bound performances. In their prospective or prototype form, I call these phenomena ‘tangible imaginaries’ as a nod to their dual status as both embodied experience and imagination space. Tangible imaginaries recast Goffman’s notion of the interaction-ritual (1967) through the lens of Butler’s conception of the “doer… constructed in and through the deed” (1990) and open up the implicit mechanics of “deeds” (encounters with social-action) as if they were available for critical redesign. This approach adapts the methodology of Critical Making by drawing from a variety of techniques, including: Ronald Grimes’s Ritual Lab pedagogy (1995), the breaching experiments of ethnomethodology (Garfinkel 1967), Lawrence Halprin’s RSVP cycles (1970), as well as design methods of bodystorming (Oulasvirta et al. 2003) and experience prototyping (Buchenau & Suri 2000).


Thursday May 12, 2016 10:45am - 11:00am
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

11:00am

Critical (of) Games in an Art School Context, a Narrative Case Study
Critical (of) Games is a new co-taught course launched in the Fall of 2015. Course material is designed to address cultural issues in art and games, while enabling students with a range of fundamental technical skills for designing and developing their own projects. Conversations about gender, economics, and access are balanced with asset design and computer programming assignments.

[[culture]]
Video games are, by profit and reach, the most popular art form. There is growing hostility within video game communities toward games focused on topics or approaches other than entertainment, and our previous students' have been reluctant to share their games and interactive art work on the internet. Where do these art forms intersect with established art worlds and what impact do they have on social and political action? Interactivity and open narrative structures can be used critically and experimentally. This course investigates the lack of exploration in the video game industry and covers instances of and culture around more critical games.

[[technical]]
We are in the middle of the first semester of this two course sequence. This first course prepares students for developing games, studying narrative, character, environment, 3D animation, coding, and distribution. In the Spring course, Students will form teams that collaboratively design, develop and release a game with a decidedly social or political focus.

[[outcome]]
We will present the course structure and outcomes as a narrative case-study on the potential subversion/engagement that can be developed by offering art and design students agency with new media tools and an atmosphere that supports critical discussion of tools, approaches and culture around video games. We will also present student projects from the two semesters.


Thursday May 12, 2016 11:00am - 11:15am
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

11:15am

Critical and Collaborative Digital Ethnography: Studying Social Surveillance and the Marginalization of Black Girls on YouTube
This paper examines the social surveillance of watching tween black girls "messing around" while twerking on YouTube. The purpose is to unveil its unintended consequences on marginalized youth in new media ecologies. The paper will meet this aim by: (1) exploring the phenomenon of black girls’ twerking in the YouTube archive; (2) explaining how twerking as bedroom vlogging is read (or misread) by unintended audiences; and (3) discussing the implications of social surveillance for marginalized girls in YouTube's specific new media ecology. 

In 2013 I stumbled upon this adventure in marginalized tweens' online sexuality and play. Ironically it was also International Women's Day. Rapper/pop star Nicki Minaj was featured in a new music video titled "Freaks" by male rapper French Montana. In less than 24 hours, the video went viral with over 1 million views and the top demographic among those views were females 13-17 or 18-24. The partial nudity of Minaj's possibly surgically-enhanced breasts surely keyed young girls' attention towards her privileged celebrity status and persona as a "bad bitch”—doing whatever she wants and owning it. I wondered how little black girls were mirroring the squatting and popping of her ass towards the camera as Minaj was ”seated" with her back to the audience on a lavish gold throne chair. The image was fitting. Minaj is one of wealthiest and most powerful emcees of all time, especially among women. 

With the help of over 100 students in various sections of an introduction to cultural anthropology course and a few anthropological analysis capstone courses, we watched and coded over 600 videos of tween and teen black girls twerking in the blurred privacy of a bedroom or other living spaces in their homes. Their millennial eyes and interpretations offered new insights that my baby-boomer eyes could not see. I discuss the implications for ethnography as a form of “compassion studies” for marginalized groups online. 

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 11:15am - 11:30am
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281

11:45am

Speaking Styles, Sound Studies, and Pitch-Tracking: A Demonstration
What makes a poet, a performer, a politician, or a preacher compelling to listen to? When we describe a speaker as neutral, dramatic, or monotonous, one implied feature is intonation, the rise and fall of the voice, as well as pitch range. While the field of sound studies develops apace, voice recognition and voice profiling are used in surveillance and employee recruitment, and debates about “NPR voice” and “poet voice” proliferate on social media, quantitative analysis of the voice is still uncommon among humanist scholars concerned with the enormous audio archive of vocal recordings. Pitch-tracking is routinely employed in corpus linguistics—a term for the digital humanities in the U.K.—but its use is novel in sound studies and DH in the U.S. It has the potential to defamiliarize texts, as Tanya Clement has argued about other DH methods, opening them to new angles of scholarly inquiry.

This interactive demonstration of a new pitch-tracking tool will allow the audience to see, in real-time, visualizations of the pitch range and intonation patterns of short vocal recordings of poems and speech, in line graphs and figures. This tool derives from the audio analysis program ARLO (Adaptive Recognition with Layered Optimization), developed through the NEH-sponsored High Performance Sound Technologies for Access and Scholarship (HiPSTAS). ARLO rivals programs commonly used by linguists, such as Praat, which are difficult to learn and have trouble tracking pitch in longer recordings of poor audio quality—a characteristic of much of the audio archive. The simple user interface for the ARLO pitch-tracker is the result of my collaboration, on an ACLS Digital Innovations Fellowship in 2015-16, with phonetician Georgia Zellou, sound and media artist and designer Dave Cerf, and David Tcheng, a machine learning scientist and senior audio signal analyst for GoPro, formerly of the Illinois Informatics Institute. (A current version of the interface is attached; it may change somewhat by May.)

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 11:45am - 12:45pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

1:00pm

Reading Speech: Virginia Woolf, Machine Learning, and the Quotation Mark
This presentation offers preliminary findings and future plans for a text analysis project that examines Virginia Woolf’s irregular uses of quotation marks throughout her corpus as the moments in which her interests in heard sound, print text, and the politics of recording intersect. Most digital text analysis protocols treat punctuation marks as extraneous information, focusing on the vocabulary itself as the tokens of interest. My project explores just these often-overlooked markings as the most representative examples of the human voice in a text and, accordingly, deeply embedded in questions of power, politics, and what it means to be human. The preliminary findings show a sharp decrease in the proportions of text that Woolf devotes to quoted speech over her career, and I argue for an analogous stylistic shift in her work from more Victorianist prose to more modernist aesthetics. This general trajectory is accompanied by a shift away from interests in society and towards the individual, and I argue that this decline corresponds to a considerable increase in the amount of speech that Woolf does not flag with quotation marks, moments that closely mirror modernist experiments in narrated thought. By adapting machine learning and natural language processing techniques, the project trains the computer to identify speech-like moments where no quotation marks appear. Bringing such unpunctuated speech to the surface stands to reshape our understanding of Woolf’s writing practice as one as much centered on the radical inscription of sound as on a new aesthetics of the text.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 1:00pm - 1:15pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

1:15pm

Countermapping Dangerous Geographies
As part of a research project entitled "Dangerous Geographies: The social abandonment of racialized women in South LA and Vancouver's Downtown Eastside", I am experimenting with different mapping software in order to counter some of the crime mapping trends in mass media web platforms (specifically, the LA Times' Homicide Report). 'Dangerous Geographies' analyzes the fact of and response to the murder of over 100 African-American women in South LA and 60 women (majority Indigenous) in Vancouver between 1987 and 2010). I analyze these cases mostly in terms of two things: 1. how they tell a story about city life and social abandonment - i.e. the withdrawal of social services and the increase in crime-seeking policing, the absence of addiction care, the criminalization of sex work - and 2. how they draw out public narratives of the disposability of Black and Indigenous women. At HASTAC 2016, I would like to talk about how countermapping practices - e.g. annotating crime maps with multimedia content, drawing out data that lays out structural obstacles to living a less threatened life - might push back against the way that crime mapping reinscribes a fatalistic collapse of blighted neighbourhoods and ruined women.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 1:15pm - 1:30pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

1:30pm

Modeling a National Media Conversation: Agent-based models, Sonification, and the case of “Mark Twain”
This paper uses agent-based models (ABMs) and sonification to investigate media coverage of “Mark Twain” as it has been preserved in a digital collection of historic 19th and early 20th century newspapers assembled as part of the Chronicling America Project at the Library of Congress. I argue that the combination of ABMs and sonification offers a somatic alternative to the reliance on visualization that characterizes much digital humanities work on textual corpora: this embodied perspective, part of a movement toward what has been called data "perceptualization," provides access to a greater array of sensory experiences a dataset may provoke and invites the creation of exploratory, experimental, experiential narratives that are no more or less defensible than narratives produced by more widespread approaches to data analysis.

I begin my discussion by outlining the creation of an AMB that invites users to adopt the perspective of an agent navigating a digital environment in which “Mark Twain” is a central topic of interest. I then demonstrate that occupying space within the model provides users an opportunity to experience the conversation surrounding “Mark Twain” as it unfolds in real-time; and, I show how sonification may be employed to enhance this experience by providing as sense of the sonic environment created by conversations as they unfold. I conclude by comparing insights obtained by visualizing my dataset with those produced by modeling the same data.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 1:30pm - 1:45pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

1:45pm

Technoliterate Lives
Nearly 30 years after the genesis of the world wide web, internet and computer literacies are still often conceptualized through an all-or-nothing binary. 15 years after its publication, Marc Prensky's 2001 framework of "Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants" remains a powerful metaphor frequently employed to describe this binary opposition: users are either "digital natives" born into a wired world, or "digital immigrants" who struggle to learn to navigate the land of the internet and communicate in its strange new language as non-native speakers of tech.

This presentation aims to complicate the conception of a digital native/immigrant divide by examining the technoliterate lives of older adults—articulating the preliminary results of an ongoing ethnographic study of computer and internet users, age 60+, in a Florida retirement community. The data and reflections gathered thus far reflect that digital literacy development and practice continues across a lifetime, and, as the speaker will argue, is an integral component of the civic, intellectual, social, and cultural participation of older adults in American society. With this study, the speaker adds to the understanding of digital literacy and engagement by starting inquiry from the lives of an important community that has remained largely un(der)examined by both humanities and technology scholars. To conclude, the speaker will make a case for a broader understanding of intersectionality, that encompasses not only race, gender, class, and sexuality, but also age as an important element of identity and category of analysis, particularly within a constantly wired and increasingly aging American population.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 1:45pm - 2:00pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

2:30pm

Speculative Classroom Design: What’s Your University Worth Fighting For?
In this panel, we invite audience participants to imagine “a university worth fighting for,” one that seeks to promote inclusivity, justice, and equality. In doing so, we aim to think beyond many of the institutions, disciplines, pedagogies, and academic practices in U.S. higher education today, which effectively reproduce the status quo by emphasizing exclusivity, ratings, and selectivity rather than broad access and equity. Based on our experiences organizing the year long HASTAC/Futures Initiative “University Worth Fighting For” #fight4edu series, this panel will feature several short five-minute presentations by respondents, each of whom attempt to reimagine the university, starting from the site of the classroom. The remainder of the session will be devoted to imaginative, speculative, and interactive exercises that aim to inspire audience members, and collaborative strategizing about how we can actualize our universities worth fighting for. Our goal is to offer audience members egalitarian practices and techniques they can use to transform the power structures in their own classrooms tomorrow--and principles and theories they can then use to apply these techniques to larger issues of university transformation: curriculum revision, disciplinary structures, credentialing and reward systems, labor practices, and beyond.

This interactive session is part of the “University Worth Fighting For” #fight4edu series.


Thursday May 12, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

4:00pm

Monster Collaborations: Approaching the Frankenstein Bicentennial through the Humanities and Informal STEM Learning
We would like to propose a custom session around a newly launched interdisciplinary effort that we think aligns closely with the HASTAC 2016 theme. This four-year project on transmedia public engagement will culminate in a set of activities timed to the bicentennial of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, using this pervasive modern myth to engage public audiences around contemporary science-in-society questions. The project’s major activities (abstract attached in separate file) include the creation of a digital museum for curating and sharing a wide range of digital artifacts, a set of Frankenstein’s Footlocker activity kits for use in science centers, museums and other supervised settings, and a series of maker challenges and activities using easily available materials.

This custom session will introduce the project and discuss its potential as a compelling model for research that unites approaches from the digital humanities, social sciences, museum studies, design and allied fields. Since all of the grant’s principal investigators are based fully or primarily at ASU, we have a unique opportunity to introduce the HASTAC community to a diverse collaborative research team (and vice versa) to share work in progress on a major humanities-focused effort.

For the panel we would request either 60 or 90 minutes, depending on the wisdom of the program committee, to achieve three primary goals:

1) lay out the current status of the project through short presentations from project investigators

2) play-test prototype activities from the Footlocker and maker challenges to solicit feedback from HASTAC attendees

3) leave time for higher-level discussion about the project as an example of (we hope) broadly impactful, publicly engaged humanities research.


Thursday May 12, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195
 
Friday, May 13
 

10:30am

A Digital Renaissance: Innovating in Medieval and Early Modern Studies
Technology has proven to have a great impact on humanistic research in recent years, with many scholars working with and around digital media, the social web, and software that bears on traditional humanities techniques. Highlighting the use of digital humanities scholarship in medieval and early modern studies, this panel is in deep conversation with the past and the present as panelists discuss projects ranging from text analysis tools, dynamic websites, and educational games. Inherently interdisciplinary, these projects can work to increase public engagement with typically academic scholarship, as well as offer new and innovative perspectives on canonical authors that include Shakespeare and Chaucer. As scholarship and pedagogy are increasingly born digital, it is urgently necessary to be able to navigate our humanistic history and origins with a mind to bringing this material and analytical insight to current students, academia, and the learning public. This panel will bring together scholars working in several fields who are working on individual and collaborative digital humanities in the medieval and early modern periods. Brief presentations will foster a broader conversation with HASTAC 2016 conference attendees in order to reimagine and assess digital tools and approaches to humanities scholarship, and projects will be made available for interaction. This panel is sponsored by the HASTAC TAMeR group.


Friday May 13, 2016 10:30am - 11:30am
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

11:45am

Introducing Kronofoto: an open source digital archive management tool for chronological photo collections
Kronofoto is an open source tool for managing small to medium-sized digital photo archives involving a chronological/historical theme. It originated as a web-based digital asset management tool used to host and administer Fortepan Iowa, a digital archive of high resolution amateur photos of Iowa and Iowans taken over the past 150 years. Fortepan Iowa, launched at the University of Northern Iowa and presented at HASTAC 2015, is a collaboration between three different departments, across four different disciplines: public history, computer science, visual communication, and photography. Kronofoto is the technology that enabled this multidisciplinary endeavour: while still a prototype, it was successfully utilized to build an archive consisting of more than 5,000 photos contributed by more than 150 local Iowa donors and processed by 165 students. This paper showcases the first public release of Kronofoto, as well as the lessons our team has learned through managing a digital archive over the past year.

We focus on three key aspects of Kronofoto: browsing facilities, functionality for scholarly use, and interoperability with other repositories. Kronofoto offers a choice of browsing interfaces including chronological, geospatial, and faceted navigation, thus enabling visual exploration of the archive in a nonlinear manner, which is essential for scholarship in the humanities. The functionality designed for scholars includes image annotation and custom image subsets; image URIs provide for image citing and sharing, as well as embedding in blogs and web pages. Finally, Kronofoto implements the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) APIs designed to facilitate reuse of image resources across digital image repositories maintained by cultural heritage organizations.

The ultimate goal of our team is to provide the digital humanities community with a simple tool for building and showcasing digital archives like Fortepan Iowa. We hope Kronofoto becomes that tool.


Friday May 13, 2016 11:45am - 12:45pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

1:00pm

Open Stories with Open Sources
Twelve students ages 17-22. Twelve seniors ages 64-93. One semester’s oral history project utilizing open source technologies bridged generations and campuses. Students in Robin Morris’s Oral History class at Agnes Scott College in Decatur, Georgia paired with residents at nearby Clairmont Oaks Assisted Living Residences. The students’ goal was to document some of residents’ life stories and lessons while practicing methodology.

Students used their phones as listening tools—but not in the way one might expect. They shut off the texting, email, and social media and pressed record.

Students uploaded completed interviews to a course website and presented in class. The stories varied-- 35 years in addiction recovery, first job “sexing chicks,” cross-country RV travel, adoptions, elopements-- and showed students that they don’t have to plan everything by graduation.

Working with Alison Valk , Multimedia Instructional Librarian from Georgia Tech, students transformed hourlong interviews into 8 minute podcasts utilizing open source audio editing tools. Students enhanced content and narratives using technology. The same skills they use to write papers became more relatable with technology. For the first time in college, students had a project they shared with family.

At semester’s end, students mounted an exhibit at Clairmont Oaks Assisted Living and hosted a party for the community. Elders received cds of the full interview and podcast and had a product they, too, shared with friends and family.

In this proposed hour session, participants will learn more about how we structured this project how participants might implement a similar project in their own communities. Participants will receive a PDF booklet of lessons, forms, and tips. Attendees will also go through a mini-project beginning with practicing oral history interview techniques. The session will use open source Audacity, a free beginning level software package, to introduce participants to the podcasting part of the project.


Friday May 13, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

2:30pm

Teaching Intersectionality through Critical Game Design
In teaching a class on feminist praxis, it can be challenging to present the concept of “intersectionality” or the interlocking systems of oppression, which produce and maintain cultures of domination without flattening out the real hierarchies and privileges that exist or, in turn, essentializing identity. In this workshop, we offer an exercise of critical design on diversity that challenges participants to create a game on “intersectionality,” which helps participants understand how systems operate in tandem to oppress (encourage “othering” and discrimination) or, conversely, when disassembled, to liberate (by fostering community and activism). This heuristic exercise is intended as a tool for teachers to bring into the classroom and as a learning experience for students to understand the complexity of systems of power. In setting up the exercise, we briefly discuss its use in a Spring 2016 class on feminist media.

The roadmap for the workshop includes an introduction on how games might provide us with new insights into models of structural oppression as well as the possibilities for imagining counter publics. Participants will be given a tool kit outlining basic elements of game design with attention to building systems of mechanics and shaping player experience goals. In groups, they will be asked to identify two areas or systems of power and to explore how these vectors intersect. Based on their selection and conversation, groups will do a rapid prototype for a game that illuminates how the system reinforces the power dynamics or inverts the system so that alliances rather than hierarchies and inequalities are formed. Extended time will be given to play testing each of the groups’ design as well as well as a closing feedback session.

Crenshaw, Kimberlé. "Demarginalizing the intersection of race and sex: A black feminist critique of antidiscrimination doctrine, feminist theory and antiracist politics." U. Chi. Legal F. (1989): 139.

Flanagan, Mary, and Helen Nissenbaum. Values at Play in Digital Games. 1 edition. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2014. Print.


Friday May 13, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195

4:00pm

Critical Design, Deviant Critique
While a significant amount of digital studies research focuses on the intricacies of encoding, preserving, and expressing data, less attention has been paid to questions of design, including the roles that situated knowledge and social relations play in the production of new media projects. With a bias toward critical design (Dunne and Raby n.d.; DiSalvo 2009; Balsamo 2011), this birds of a feather session will begin with a series of presentations followed by an open discussion about why critical design matters, for whom, and in what contexts. Emphasis will be placed on the intersections of critical design with forms of critique that deviate from entrenched articulations of data and digital work in our current moment. Knight will address the absence of critical design in consumer-driven developments in wearable technology, considering projects such as PeriodShare, which broadcasts menstruation information to one’s social network, and Rokudenashiko’s “vagina selfie” project, where Rokudenashiko distributed 3-d design files for her anatomy, as counter-examples. Ray Murray will extend conceptualisations that assume an inextricablity of form and content to include making in different cultural contexts, looking at South Asia as a specific example to demonstrate how Indian design practices and cultures of making, while having some points of contact with such praxis elsewhere, are uniquely forged by historical, institutional and economic circumstances. Sayers will outline ways of intertwining critical design methodologies with rapid prototyping techniques in laboratory contexts, highlighting ways of prototyping that brush against hobbyist celebrations of fabrication technologies typically witnessed within popular maker culture. Finally, Wernimont will report on the technical and interactive work currently being done for the “Safe Harbor” project, which uses haptics (vibrotactile perception) and sonification to not only articulate insights about the related California Eugenics Archive project but also explore how critical design offers new affordances in working with sensitive data. Collectively, these talks will ask how critique happens within design practice, and they will prompt the audience to share their own perspectives on how critical design should happen.


Friday May 13, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
COOR 195 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR 195