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Culture and Ethics [clear filter]
Thursday, May 12
 

10:30am

Complex Systems in Digital Humanities: Corpus Linguistics and Variation
As I have shown (Kretzschmar 2009, 2015), the basic elements of speech--i.e., language in use, what people actually say and write to and for each other-- correspond to what has been called a “complex system” in sciences ranging from physics to ecology to economics. I will introduce the principles of complexity science in a non-technical way, and then apply properties of complexity to corpus linguistics and language varieties. In corpus linguistics, complex systems tells us, through its property of nonlinear distributions, how to manage the traditional issue of balancing the need to find just the right documents (precision) vs. finding all the relevant documents (recall). Complexity theory also suggests how we can find the particular aspects of language that differentiate the writing of one author from another, say in a study of a corpus made from the works of one author in comparison with a corpus of writings by other people from the same period. Thus, we can apply the linguistics of speech to problems we need to address, and thereby do a better job of using digital means to understanding the language variation around us.

Reference

Kretzschmar, William A., Jr. 2009. The Linguistics of Speech. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Kretzschmar, William A., Jr. 2015. Language and Complex Systems. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 10:30am - 10:45am
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

10:45am

The Corpus of Revenge Tragedy (CoRT): Toward Interdisciplining Early Modern Genre Analysis
Digital Humanities (DH) enhances early modern English dramatic studies through its capacity to complement existing modes of literary analysis and disrupt practices of interpretation and knowledge construction. Additionally, within the work of genre analysis, DH can provocatively explore a genre’s discursivity and its position as a cultural phenomenon. In the continued study of early modern revenge tragedy—a genre that has received relatively little attention in comparison to others—DH invaluably demonstrates this genre’s increasing participation in discourses of medicine and anatomy by tracing the movement of anatomical language from the medical register to a dramatic one. This project reports on a corpus linguistics genre analysis of early modern revenge tragedy and widens the scope of inquiry about the roles of the body and anatomical language in revenge tragedy. I created the Corpus of Revenge Tragedy (CoRT) as an experimental corpus of 40 revenge tragedies to compare against Shakespeare’s corpus, the Early Modern English Medical Texts Corpus (EMEMT), the Corpus of English Dialogues (CED), and the EEBO-TCP database of more than 25,000 texts. To map increasing frequencies of anatomical and medical vernacular in this genre, AntConc was used to compare these corpora. To focus interpretation, I collated—through traditional concordance-making methods—an Anatomical Lexicon (AL) of representative material and metaphorical words from revenge tragedies. Using my AL to compare word frequencies in the experimental CoRT against the control corpora, I demonstrate and depict—through data visualization and geospatial mapping—the lexical comparability between revenge tragedies and contemporary medical texts. Such an examination of how revenge tragedies adopted and exploited the medical register is significant to understanding not only the cultural significance of the revenge tragedy genre but also early modern conceptions of embodiment and the pervasiveness of the contemporary medical arena in popular culture.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 10:45am - 11:00am
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

11:00am

Darwin's Semantic Voyage
Search in an environment with an uncertain distribution of resources involves a trade-off between local exploitation and distant exploration. This extends to the problem of information foraging, where a knowledge-seeker shifts between reading in depth and studying new domains. To study this, we examine the reading choices made by one of the most celebrated scientists of the modern era: Charles Darwin. Darwin built his theory of natural selection in part by synthesizing disparate parts of Victorian science. When we analyze his extensively self-documented reading, we find he does not follow a pattern of surprise-minimization. Rather, he shifts between phases in which he either remains with familiar topics or seeks cognitive surprise in novel fields. On the longest timescales, these shifts correlate with major intellectual epochs of his career, as detected by Bayesian epoch estimation. When we compare Darwin's reading path with publication order of the same texts, we find Darwin more adventurous than the culture as a whole. These results provide novel quantitative evidence for historical hypotheses previously debated only qualitatively.


Thursday May 12, 2016 11:00am - 11:15am
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

11:15am

Delving into Google DeepMind: Using Rhetorical Analysis as an Approach to Algorithmic Literacy
Ted Striphas is researching “algorithmic culture,” by which he means “the use of computers and complex mathematical routines to sort, classify, and create hierarchies for our many forms of human expression and association” (Striphas, 2011). He uses the term “algorithmic literacies” to describe a critical approach to, and recognition of, the activities and consequences of algorithmic activity. Cathy Davidson calls for a 4th “R” of literacy — beyond reading, writing, and arithmetic — to be algorithms. Because algorithms are “as basic to the way the 21st century digital age works as reading, writing, and arithmetic were to the late 18th century Industrial era” (Davidson, 2011), she maintains that literacy in algorithms should become a focus of school literacy efforts.

As the call for algorithmic literacy spreads, the question for digital scholars in the humanities and social sciences is clear: What does it mean to be literate in algorithms? Beyond a study of obvious effects of algorithms (like online ads that “follow” our browsing and purchasing habits) and less visible effects (like customized online search results based on network IP address and geolocation), can we develop a critical approach to the very language of algorithms, the code that enacts algorithmic activity? This paper proposes algorithmic literacy as a potential configuration of technological and humanistic domains by introducing a rhetorical approach to an artificial intelligence algorithm developed by Google DeepMind. The paper seeks to apply traditional and nontraditional rhetorical analysis strategies to the algorithm as textual representation toward developing methods for understanding the persuasive nature of algorithms as composed texts.

Davidson, C. (2011, October 31). What are the 4 R’s essential to 21st century learning? [Blog post]. HASTAC. Retrieved November 16, 2015, from https://www.hastac.org/blogs/
cathy-davidson/2011/10/31/what-are-4-rs-essential-21st-century-learning

Striphas, T. (2011, October 17). Algorithmic literacies [Blog post]. The late age of print: Beyond the book. Retrieved November 15, 2015, from http://www.thelateageofprint.org/2011/10/17/algorithmic-literacies

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 11:15am - 11:30am
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

11:45am

Maps and Models

Maps and Models I: Power

Mapping and modeling networks of power is the focus of this session. The papers present projects that examine discourses of belief and doubt, race and internment, empire and insurgency, the circulation of gossip, news and journalism, and affect and the built environment.

 

 

Presenters include:

 

1). Jacob Lassin

Discourses of Belief and Doubt: Topic Modeling a Russian Orthodox Magazine

 

I will topic model the website of the Russian Orthodox magazine Foma which is billed as a "magazine for doubters." It is a magazine that is geared towards a sort of Orthodox "educated elite" or new Orthodox intelligentsia. I believe that topic modeling will provide me with a better sense of the sorts of discourses that are present in this journal with regards to Russian politics, history and its cultural heritage as a means of better understanding the concerns and foci of this Orthodox "educated elite." This method allows me to cover far more ground I would be able to do just reading on my own. To accomplish this I will use web scraping to be able to process the articles as plain text and be able to run them through Mallet and new packages developed by Ted Underwood. With this project I will address similar issues as other members of the panel who are also concerned with textual analysis as we discuss approaches of extracting and cleaning data, theoretical questions about what topic modeling can actually teach us and how to move from Mallet to a website where information can be accessed and explored in greater depth in each topic.

 

2). Courtney Sato

Curating Japanese American Internment and “Negative Cultural Heritage” Online

 

The WWII internment of Japanese Americans continues to reverberate in contemporary American life. Recent incidents suggest that Japanese American internment remains a little-understood historical footnote. At present there is no cohesive online platform for understanding this history, a void this project seeks to fill.  This project combines digital methodologies for curating and delivering content with the aims of serving a broader public beyond the university. In rendering certain archival materials accessible through this website, this project seeks to reexamine the ways we are taught to read or interact with university archives and library collections—especially those dealing with “negative cultural history” like internment. This project asks: how might one navigate such collections in new and diverse ways that extend beyond the conventional finding aid and individual “box” of materials one encounters in the reading room? What circuits have these objects traversed to end up in a university archive? What are the questions of copyright and ethics at stake in the collection of sensitive, “cultural heritage” materials like those featured in Yale University’s internment collections? How might a digital platform allow users to interact with the collections through mapping, the overlay of metadata, or topic model to ask novel questions?

 

3). Gavriel Cutipa-Zorn

Charting a Global Atlas of Model Villages and Counterinsurgency

 

In 1982, Israeli advisors trained the Guatemalan military to build model villages throughout the countryside as a method of “soft” counterinsurgency. Advisors invoked the success of the British army in suppressing the 1885 Burmese War. I will map locations that colonial progenitors of the model village describe within declassified documents, using a map-based interface. Moving from the American Occupation in the Philippines and Vietnam to Algeria and Burma, the project will create a digital library that includes primary and secondary source material linked to each country where models village was used. The project contributes, in both empirical and conceptual ways, to the increasing trend in scholarship to situate research on Israel/Palestine within a global context. This project facilitates and promotes empirical research on this question by building a centralized archive of hitherto scattered primary and secondary source documents. My approach opens an alternative conceptual framework on the conflict, one that opens up new avenues of thinking through Israel/Palestine on a global level. While dominant exceptionalist narratives of the conflict obscure influential forces taking place outside of its nation-state boundaries, the digital collection’s map-based interface will unveil the global networks and transnational matrices of power that are embedded in and critical to understanding the conflict.

 

4). Nick Frisch

The Evolution of Information History in Late Imperial and Early Modern China

 

I will be using digital methods to parse Notes from the Cottage of Subtle Perception (Yuewei Caotang Biji for short), a collection of approximately 1200 paragraph-long anecdotes, gossip, and observations recorded by Ji Yun (1724–1805), secretary and chief compiler of the Qianlong Emperor. It was highly unusual for a man in Ji Yun's position to produce these proto-journalistic writings, yet they circulated within his lifetime, beyond the coterie of educated men who traditionally constituted China's literary field. More unusual still, the anecdotes are rigorously sourced to contemporaneous figures, dated to or within precise years, linked to exact geographic locations, and laced with editorial comment about the credibility of informants and potential accuracy of the stories. It is divided into five sections which were completed and circulated at various points through Ji's life before final compilation into the Yuewei collection.

 

Using named entity recognition and network analysis, I will create visualizations that map this text's references across the spatial geography of the Qing empire, the social field of elite Qing literati, and through the decades of Ji Yun's career. This will provide an alternative means of both reading the text, and analyzing its significance (current scholarship views the work as a collection of ghost stories, which is a partial telling). In the process, I hope to develop a working model for parsing Chinese texts that circumvents the limitations of DH tools originally designed for European languages and epistemes, and will support my dissertation work.

 

5 & 6). Peter Racugglia and Andrew Brown

Infrastructures of Feeling: Literature, Affect, and the Built Environment in Seventeenth-Century London and Nineteenth-Century Philadelphia

 

This project will use GIS and spatial analysis technologies to examine how infrastructure produces and redirects flows not only of capital, energy, or material resources, but also of affects. Our aim is to visualize both the ways in which the built environments of seventeenth-century London and nineteenth-century Philadelphia were reshaped through large-scale infrastructural projects, and the ways in which literary works differentially encode affective attachments to these changing urban landscapes. Seventeenth-century London and nineteenth-century Philadelphia have each featured prominently in scholarly narratives of urban modernization: the former as the metropole of a colonial and mercantile empire then in its infancy, and the latter as a crucible for distinctly American forms of political debate and public discourse. Indeed, the early history of Philadelphia itself—founded in 1682 by the Quaker politician William Penn, partly in response to ongoing disputes over religious toleration in England—might be said to function as a kind of threshold from which these distinct media cultures can be examined simultaneously. By juxtaposing these two sites, moreover, the project will also attempt to trace broad conceptual shifts in the understanding of the category of “infrastructure” itself across the period, as authors, their publics, and the inhabitants of each city engaged with wide-ranging structural changes in their environment.

 

 

 

Maps and Models II: Aesthetics

This panel focuses on spatializations of aesthetic form through mapping, modeling and other techniques. Papers present projects that examine the economic value of nature, race, big data and social media, film festivals and their global circuits post 1932, reconstruction of the Paris Salon, and the work of Yayoi Kasuma.

 

 

Presenters include:

 

1). Alyssa Battistoni

Mapping Nature’s Value(s): Representing Nature Beyond Capital

 

“What’s your neighborhood worth”? This is the question asked by the David Suzuki Foundation’s “Putting Natural Capital on the Map” application, which aims to spatially represent the value of nature as measured by the growing field of natural capital economics. The foundation declares that “nature is, of course, priceless”—yet notes that this invocation of intrinsic value isn’t useful to developers and officials who are trying to decide whether and how to develop land. But what other kinds of value might we want to take into account in making such decisions? What are the potential effects of seeing nature as capital? And how might we represent nature's value otherwise?


My project layers different kinds of data atop maps of natural capital in an attempt to offer a richer representation of the value(s) of nature. In …


Thursday May 12, 2016 11:45am - 2:00pm
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

2:30pm

Loose-ing Our Heads: Knowledge-Making Across the Social Body
Historically, the concept of embodied cognition distinguished itself from the assumption that cognition only happened in the brain. By contrast, Big Data promises the omniscience of surveillance and the infallibility of algorithms, offering disembodied processing as a way to render theoretical models, the people/bodies who generate them, and the geographies of their development irrelevant. In such a time, locating cognition in bodies and place becomes a distinction once again. But what are the affordances of once more tethering knowledge making to a set of bodies and their histories? Why, in practical rather than ethical terms, would an academic be interested in her body or her community as a knowledge-making resource?

Drawing on the fields of Communication, Education, Cognitive Science, and Science and Technology Studies, this workshop explores the qualities of the incongruent sets that result from computational, personal, and collaborative knowledge making practices. It first reminds us that approaching knowledge with an eye to its generative locations reveals a thick and socially located history out of line with the origin stories that seat “pure” science in nature. Then, it follows concepts of knowledge making from the brain, through the body, and into collaboration between multiple bodies. Finally, it offers extended hands-on engagement to both to demonstrate concepts and while reflexively generating understanding of our academic practices of embodied cognition.

During the majority of this workshop, participants will employ applied techniques drawn from open space practices, active learning, popular education, critical pedagogy, and applied theater, developing facility with these tools while performing them to generate a collaborative map of our embodied academic practices and the social dynamics in which they are located. The results of these practices will be visible both through material documentation and observable performances.


Thursday May 12, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

4:00pm

An Archive and Repertoire of Digital Humanities and Media Projects in the Performing Arts
The digital has created not only new methods of communication and exchange, but also changed our ways of conceptualizing both performing arts generally, and the knowledge-production in and around the performing arts. In recent years, the digital humanities have been the locus for a more general, interdisciplinary conversation around these issues. While there is a long tradition of performance-based experimentation with technology — ranging from the futurists’ performances to contemporary motion capture dances by artists — the question of how the performing arts can fit into the discourse of the digital humanities seems to be a fairly new one. For many scholars, the digital humanities and performing arts have been equated with the quantitative study of plays and other textual elements of theatre as well as movement in dance-related projects.

This session queries the more wide-ranging impact of the digital humanities on theatre and performance studies and the artistic practices in the field but will also inquire about the impact of performance theory on the digital humanities. What might digital theories and practices offer to scholarly and critical analyses of theatre and performance practice? How has the field of the digital humanities been and continues to be impacted by performance theory and practice? What are some of the challenges and possibilities that the interconnected fields of digital humanities and theatre and performance studies are facing today?

Before the conference, participants create a collective bibliography, and a number of reflections on HASTAC.org. At the conference, participants will demo projects or performances. This is followed by a conversation about the questions above or other questions and commonalities coming up during the run of the session.

Concretely, the session, in its entire run, will generate a collaboratively created blog and conversation, reflecting on the impact of digital humanities-oriented projects on the field of theatre and performance studies as well as theatre, drama, and performance in itself, and the impact of performance theory and performance practices on digital humanities.


Thursday May 12, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18
 
Friday, May 13
 

10:30am

Crowdsourced Geo-Data Meets Sexual Violence: Activism, Design, and the Ethical Life of Technologies
Bangladesh’s birth is grafted on the memory of widespread sexual violence; the 1971 Independence War witnessed the weaponized rape of 200,000 Bengali women. Once ‘liberated’, survivors lost ownership over their experience of trauma as the narrative became symbolically and materially re-constituted by the state. Scholars such Yasmin Saikia have pressed against this legacy, retrieving suppressed voices and speaking to their “rich,” “varied,” and “polyversal” nature.

The recent surge in gender-based and sexual violence, as indicated by the even depressed official figures, has drawn attention to the plight of Bengali women yet again. In November 2014, VICE News ran an expose on Bangladesh’s “rape epidemic,” one rooted in traditionalist values “intent on the subjugation of women.”

Similar accounts by media, human interest reports, and scholarship reveal an increased effort to circumvent the social and institutional conditions silencing rape survivors in Bangladesh, intervening by “giving voice” – whether through the circulation of curated narratives, turning the lens onto subaltern spaces, or the proliferation of ‘technologies of testimony.’

‘Technologies of testimony’ are created with the intent to capture, process, represent and intervene on sexual violence – Bijoya’ and ‘Protibadi are just two of a growing number of initiatives attempting to do so through the adoption of crowdmapping software that produces a “geospatial visualization of testimony.”

Existing literature, both by the designers of these projects and those critical of their externalities, has failed to provide an account of the complex, socially situated design processes from which these technologies arise – the way in which moments of ‘closure’ affix certain forms of knowledge politics to the material constitution and social practices of activist cybercartography.

This paper begins by refusing an account of digital technology as merely a prosthetic for human capacities. Unpacking the technological affordances of cybercartography and tracking the ways in which these analog to digital conversions inflect upon a projects like ‘Bijoya’, I argue that participatory crowdmapping of sexual violence in Bangladesh subordinates social justice to a fetish of data and technocratic rationality.

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 10:30am - 10:45am
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

10:45am

Mapping Homelessness
This paper presents preliminary results from a larger research program that asks two interrelated questions: How can digital mapping facilitate new analyses of homelessness? And, how can undertaking socially engaged research on homelessness facilitate new understandings digital mapping? This paper, as a part of that larger project, documents the interpretive process of data analysis in conjunction with the mechanical process of mapping to argue that socially engaged and theoretically informed methods are a vital, if often overlooked, component of scholarship on the geoweb.

Homeless counts are one of the most common measures for determining homeless populations in urban areas. They are conducted as point-in-time exercises, meaning that the data collected represents a snapshot of homelessness on a single day. So, while such counts are statistically limited in what they are able to tell us, they are nonetheless the best instruments currently in use to gather basic data. This project uses the point-in-time dataset of Homeward Trust, a comprehensive community housing organization in Edmonton, Canada, who have undertaken 10 such counts to date.

I argue that to develop maps from this dataset is to develop discursive actors that produce spaces as much as they describe them. To build a map is to build discourse, to build knowledge. The series of maps that I will present in this paper represent just such discursive objects – objects to be read, challenged, and analysed – not simply believed. By highlighting the fact that the scholarship I am producing is, itself, a potential object of study, this paper both tells (some of) the stories of homelessness in Edmonton, and highlights how attentive we must be to the truth claims that our digital productions make, often in spite of our best efforts.

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 10:45am - 11:00am
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

11:00am

What America Ate
The 1930s are a fascinating moment to study food. At a time of economic upheaval, mass internal migrations, and the rapid industrialization of agriculture and the food supply, examining how ordinary people bought, cooked, ate, and thought about food can reveal aspects of American life that scholars still know little about. The project is digitizing and preserving an array of materials related to food in the Great Depression, starting with the original America Eats papers that until now have been scattered around the country. The America Eats project was a Depression-era jobs creation program within the Works Progress Administration, which sent about 200 writers and photographers across the country to chronicle American eating by region. Writers collected amazing stories: interviewing cooks and eaters, transcribing recipes, collecting songs and jokes and poems, and describing all manner of food customs. With few exceptions, the materials have remained in obscurity ever since, unknown to most scholars and unavailable to the general public. The project is also making two other important kinds of culinary sources accessible. The first is rare: 200 local community and charity cookbooks produced around the country from 1930 to 1940, held in the MSU Library’s Special Collections and the UM Library’s Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive. These rare books, produced by small organizations like churches, clubs, and schools, will provide unique insight into the kinds of eating that went on in America during the Depression. Second, the digital archive will include 700+ rare advertisements and food packaging materials produced by food companies in the 1930s from MSU’s Sliker Culinary Ephemera Collection, which highlight how technological and commercial forces were shaping American eating in this era. The paper will show how the project is developing new ways for users to interact with, enhance, and add to the collection of recipes. The project is supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). What American Ate is a unique crowdsourcing digital project that also highlights the changing technologies of food in America.


Friday May 13, 2016 11:00am - 11:15am
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

11:15am

Taquerías Conversos: Digital Visualization of Latino Immigrant Impact on Arizona Cityscapes
This presentation uses dynamic digital visualization to provoke unexpected humanist insight into the vibrant impact of immigrants on Arizona cityscapes. Specifically, it tracks a peculiar form of the architectural uncanny that haunts everyday urbanism in metro Phoenix: taquerías. 20 years of intensive immigration brought drive-thru Mexican taquerias, serving cheap, fast, flavorful food. Many inhabit structures abandoned by iconic American fast-food chains (DQ, BK, KFC…), colonizing dead spaces made moribund by sprawl’s centrifugal pull. Taquerias revived stagnant neighborhood economies, catering to an immigrant-inflected palate, and added Latin cultural flair to the city’s subdued design palette. Despite Mexicanized makeovers, even the casual flâneur subliminally registers the iconic architecture haunting the taquerias; ad campaigns trained Americans to recognize instantly their distinctive corporate branding. The project uses 6-second Vine micro-movie loops to reenact this “conversion” from hallmark fast food chain to taqueria, performatively disclosing the homely architectural form “buried alive” beneath exuberant magical-realist redesign. In an era that would sooner squelch especially Mexican immigrant visibility at every turn, metro Phoenix holds immigrants in abundance. But city residents are reluctant to acknowledge—and cultivate—creative ways that migrants already make their imprint. This project invites appreciation for how taquerias conversos recast conventional modes of envisioning the city. The taquerias’ vibrant magical-realist decor conjures prosthetic links to the city’s (Mexican) past and inscribes border-crossing transnationalization into local city spaces. Some relish these changes, others, not so much; for many Phoenicians the bewildering repetition-compulsion of the taquerias conversos evokes an unsettling psychical-spatial estrangement as the city around them hauntingly becomes unfamiliar. For the taquerias' insurgent urbanism swerves beyond city boosters’ defensive vision of sundrenched uniformity toward embracing a complex transnationalized urban future. The video loops take a fresh look at everyday urbanism by making strange the taquerias’ mundane but ubiquitous urban form and artfully aims to lightheartedly provoke in viewers a deeper, humanist comprehension of culinary/cultural challenges posed by the city’s diasporic remaking by Latino immigrants. Sample: https://vine.co/v/MbOztBTWu5j

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 11:15am - 11:30am
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

1:00pm

Eventuality: Imagining a Future for the Humanities Through Collaborative Storytelling
Eventuality is a narrative foresight engine; a way of crafting a collective story that draws out preconceived biases about the ‘default future’ and illuminates the ways that events, things that may happen, are connected, through the lives of fictional characters. Storytelling can be a useful tool for creating scenarios and gaining insight into futures. Narrative is an accessible form that can be used to engage imaginative capacities, flesh out vital details, illuminate surprising connections, and make the scenario seem more realistic and credible by “worlding the world” of the future. Eventuality is a system designed to help a group move through key questions efficiently in a way that resolves major disputes.

The goal of this Eventuality exercise is to imagine a future for the humanities in a neoliberal university, to draw out and critique what conference attendees believe will happen in their discipline, and to create a consistent and believable story that participants can use as a touchstone for resistance to further cuts in humanities education and research. Participants will be asked to imagine future humanities professors, students, administrators, and citizens, and key events in which a humanistic understanding makes a positive difference in the world and the university.

The end result will be a narrative that illuminates problems facing the humanities today and in the near future, and hopefully demolishes some cliches, as well as a participation in a novel technique for rapidly prototyping stories, which may be used as skeletons for further writing, raw material for thematic analysis, or an introduction to discussing the multiplicity of events and interpretation.


Friday May 13, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

2:30pm

Coding Diversity, Diversities of Code: Reading and Rewriting Leadership in Technology and Computer Science
Coding Diversity, Diversities of Code presents the methods, processes, and preliminary findings of our ongoing investigations into the explicit and implicit rhetoric of the global conversation on inclusion and diversity in technology fields and professions. In this study, we examine current (2015 -2016) web documents addressing diversity among post-secondary computer science faculty and technology professionals in the United States, as compiled in two primary data sets: a) individual pieces of long- and short-form online journalism on the subject and b) social media texts produced by self-identified computer science and technology professionals from underrepresented groups, including active tech bloggers and hobbyists. Through a combination of close readings of individual texts; analytics including sentiment analysis, text clustering, and lexical analysis; and visualizations, we seek to reveal features of these texts’ vocabularies, rhetorical and affective strategies, and semantic patterns. We will remain alert to any evidence of potential conscious and unconscious bias, relationships, or patterns within and between the corpora.

Building a more effective, diverse, egalitarian culture in computer science and technology is a long game, requiring lasting interventions at every level of education and culture. Our cross-disciplinary team is committed to this purpose and to serving the academic and professional communities through research projects that result in utility beyond their present purposes: in this case, effective, reusable, publicly available code, data, methods, and documentation. Through the lenses of our individual disciplinary approaches—and their convergence on our shared research subject—we provide novel perspectives on the structures underlying the cultural discourse on diversity in technology and a useful case study of a conscious collaboration between computational and humanistic research methods. We hope that the methods and tools we develop in the process will empower others to undertake their own investigations.


Friday May 13, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18

4:00pm

New Institutional Configurations: Community Colleges and Doctoral Training in the Humanities
Community colleges and doctoral programs are not frequently thought of as partners, but as two new collaborative programs funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation show, together they can strengthen and amplify their missions and support a vision of equity and diversity in higher education. The "new majority" of college students are more racially and ethnically diverse than ever before, predominantly low-income, often the first in their families to attend college—and most are enrolled in community colleges. How does this new demographic landscape affect what should doctoral study in the humanities look like?

This session convenes representatives from the two programs, which are partnerships between the City University of New York’s Graduate Center and LaGuardia Community College, and the University of Washington and the Seattle Colleges, respectively. Both support doctoral students in teaching increasingly diverse student populations while simultaneously broadening and strengthening access to and opportunity in the humanities for undergraduates. Program administrators will describe the structures of the partnerships, giving particular attention to the ways in which the two initiatives resonate with one another and the national landscape of graduate education reform. Doctoral students currently involved in cross-institutional teaching and research will present reflections on the value of the community college as a site of professional development and offer recommendations toward building sustained and productive exchanges between two-year and four-year colleges. All will work together to facilitate a roundtable discussion and field questions and input from audience members; we will directly invite humanities faculty from Scottsdale and Mesa Community Colleges, whose campuses are adjacent to the main conference location at Arizona State University, to attend the session.


Friday May 13, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
COOR L1-18 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-18