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Innovative Pedagogy [clear filter]
Thursday, May 12
 

10:30am

Interdisciplinary Configurations of the Digital
Interdisciplinarity (ID) is often associated with pathbreaking developments, and digital work is no exception. This paper distinguishes interdisciplinary configurations in digital research and education. Methodological ID typically improves the quality of results by using a method, concept, or tool from another discipline in order to test a hypothesis or address a particular research question or problem. In contrast, Theoretical ID develops a more comprehensive general view, typically in the form of new conceptual frameworks or syntheses. Digital work is widely viewed as methodological in nature because of close association with tools and methods. Yet, the current discourse of Making is developing a new epistemology of building that dismantles the dichotomy of “making” and “thinking.” In further contrast, Instrumental ID typically focuses on creating a product or meeting a designated pragmatic need, whereas Critical ID interrogates the dominant structure of knowledge and education with the aim of transforming while raising questions of value and purpose silent in instrumental discourse. Critical ID is heightened in studies of race and gender in initiatives such as #transformDH and Postcolonial Digital Humanities as well as cultural critique of new technologies and media. The question of interdisciplinary work practice follows. Anne Balsamo’s concept of “interdisciplinary shift work” provides a helpful framework. Unlike shifts that begin and end by punching a clock, interdisciplinary shift work entails on-going travel across boundaries in academic institutions and beyond in new platforms of cultural reproduction, virtual environments, networked social spaces, and mobile access points. The “digital,” as a result, is simultaneously horizontal and vertical. It is located within local domains of disciplines, interdisciplinary fields, and professions. At the same individual practices cross-sect, with multiplicative impacts across the interdisciplinary “circuit” of digital work.

Speakers

Thursday May 12, 2016 10:30am - 10:45am
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281

10:45am

Democratizing Learning: Online Community and the Negotiated Syllabus in the Interdisciplinary Upper-Level General Education Classroom
This paper explores the benefits of framing the constructivist educational environment by developing an upper-level general education course where course content is negotiated and constructed by class participants. High impact learning practices used to involve students in the design of the course included: a negotiated syllabus, where students were involved in choosing the readings for various weeks; active journaling exercises where students engaged in different modes of learning to explore course concepts; formative assessment by collecting information on troublesome concepts at the end of each class session; online discussion as a community building tool outside of class time; and offering students different options for major course assignments. The paper concludes with the challenges and opportunities in designing and delivering a constructivist, highly negotiated course, as well as a review of the collected responses of students perception of the class experience.


Thursday May 12, 2016 10:45am - 11:00am
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

11:00am

Choose-Your-Own-Grade: Instructional Civil Disobedience
Grades, though ubiquitous, obstruct learning. Common methods for calculating and assigning grades violate basic principles of statistics and educational measurement. Well-established findings in motivational, cognitive, and positive psychology support the argument that grades should not be used. Educational philosophers have demonstrated the inherent structural unfairness of the grade point average (GPA). Yet, despite the lack of any solid grounding in any discipline, grades remain an entrenched feature of the global educational landscape. This paper describes a pedagogical approach, bordering on civil disobedience, called “choose-your-own-grade.” In this approach, students are allowed to select any grade they would like for a course without any prerequisites or conditions. While significant positional authority is retained by the instructor, a great deal of power is abdicated to students. The nature, content and quality of discourse between student and instructor changes dramatically, tending to gravitate more toward substantive, though increasingly diverse, explorations of course content, and away from the superficial. Fundamental issues regarding the form and purpose of education are both revealed and clarified, both at the individual and macro levels. The conflicts of interest inherent in our current educational culture manifest themselves when students struggling with motivation and persistence begin to reveal the complex, multifaceted pressures that pit them against their peers and instructors. While the overall level of student performance remains relatively consistent with more traditional approaches, variability increases. Subtle differences in how the experience is structured result in differing levels of student satisfaction. Ultimately, however, the choose-your-own-grade approach faces significant, and perhaps insurmountable, impediments to effectiveness within the context of modern educational institutions. Representative stories from six years of exploration of this pedagogy illustrate some of the benefits, successes, challenges, and failures of this approach.


Thursday May 12, 2016 11:00am - 11:15am
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

11:15am

An E.P.I.C. Approach to Public Digital Humanities: Externally Collaborative, Project-Based, Interdisciplinary Curricula for Learning Local History
Over the last 250 years, the Boston neighborhood of Jamaica Plain has emerged as one of the city’s most vibrant and dynamic communities. This uniqueness stems not only from the area’s cultural and class diversity, but also from a built environment that exudes connections to grand themes in the region’s history, many of which continue to shape local identity. Thus, Jamaica Plain serves as an important site for the study of how community places are made through a nexus of history, contemporary culture, and local public engagement. This paper reveals the benefits of practicing public digital humanities through a studio course at Wentworth Institute of Technology (WIT) called Media, Culture, and Communications Studies (MCCS) and an institute-wide pedagogical initiative called E.P.I.C. Learning (Externally Collaborative, Project-Based, Interdisciplinary Curricula for Learning), which has led to a meaningful digital dialogue with Jamaica Plain’s history. In particular, the course has utilized open-source/access tools such as Omeka, WorldMap, and Annotation Studio to create interactive virtual exhibits chronicling the history of two Jamaica Plain landmarks: the James Michael Curley House (the home of legendary Boston mayor, James Michael Curley), and the Loring-Greenough House (the neighbourhood’s last colonial-era home). A further component of pedagogy and scholarship has been public engagement through collaborations with local community stakeholders (city councillors, volunteer docents, companies, etc.) who have recognized the value of digital storytelling for public outreach. Overall, WIT’s MCCS Studio classes have not only provided students with valuable digital skills that strengthen their historical literacy (and—arguably—prepare them for the digital workplace), but have also provided a conduit for reconnecting Jamaica Plain community members with their local history in meaningful digital ways.


Thursday May 12, 2016 11:15am - 11:30am
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

11:45am

Hello World Well Lost
Here, I show how examples and illustrations drawn from introductory CS textbooks frequently cast knowledge of code and programming techniques in essentializing and determinist idioms; how esoteric jargon and in-jokes often dominate these texts, excluding outsiders from the start; and, significantly, how the often tacit assumptions that underwrite the rationale for learning to code while working towards a degree in CS are difficult to reconcile with the rationale a humanist might have for learning code.

Formed in the late sixties at the behest of the American military and global corporations, and everywhere dominated by the strategic norms of the marketplace (“good code” is efficient, scalable, rigorously standardized), the work of computer science is visible everywhere, and computer programming and procedural literacy their de facto domain. I ask, "What if disciplines from across the university worked to see themselves and their methodologies represented in the programming languages their students learn, and in the texts that teach them?"

I then describe a number of interdisciplinary approaches I have adopted in teaching graduate students from the humanities to code. These include design-centered, user-centered approaches; an approach emphasizing the material history of computer art; an approach linking concepts in coding to issues in philosophy and theory; an approach that drew inspiration from Dada, and required students only build useless programs; an effort to reduce reliance on computer science terminology in favor of concepts and terms drawn from across the arts and humanities (drawing on the Classical philosophical concept of an ideal, immaterial precondition for the exististance of a thing, a “class” becomes an “arche”).

I believe this would make a keen workshop, with members of various disciplines helping to sketch the outline of a new computer language, which we'd then build (in a very simple fashion) in real time. But if you are interested in this at all, I defer to your judgment as to proper format.


Thursday May 12, 2016 11:45am - 12:45pm
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

1:00pm

Process over Process: Big Data Activism, Platform Détournement and Other Resurgent Feminist Network Methods
This session explores feminist network methods as process-heavy tactics to retool the big data, digital platforms, and market rationalities that structure current value metrics. We will take up some of the collaborative strategies developed to work with and against the proliferation and privatization of big data, the corporatization and standardization of platforms, and the individuation and precarity of the neoliberal university as resurgent methods of feminist collectivity, network-building and reordering network relations.

Nicole Brown will talk about methodological innovation describing research projects where she has used traditional sociological research methods alongside computational processes. In service to Black feminism, the design and aims of these innovative mixed methods approaches challenge the biases of both computational analysis and disciplinary constructions.

T.L. Cowan will discuss how feminist collaborative processes are rich sources of information, and will identify tools-based knowledges that are collectively gathered as a network organism. This discussion of collaborative processes includes the unlikely assemblage of cabaret performance, critical pedagogy, anti-violence feminist activism and mobile media.

Veronica Paredes will review how FemTechNet has collaboratively gained access and used online tools against objectives embedded in the platforms’ designs. FemTechNet demonstrates how feminist technoscience practices connect to radical pedagogies and histories, and forge alternative futures for online education.

Jasmine Rault will follow the traces of earlier forms of feminist educational networks, from Black, Chicana and “Third World Women” feminist pedagogy and research in Freedom Schools in the 1960s and collaborative public curricula in Boston through the Cambridge Women’s School (1972-1992), as well as accountability technologies like ‘consciousness raising’ and ‘checking-in,’ as they inform contemporary strategies for surviving the neoliberal market rationality of the US and Canadian university.

K.J. Surkan will trace the battle between advocates for the HBOC (hereditary breast and ovarian cancer) community and Myriad Genetics over BRCA data sharing. I argue for understanding the Free the Data movement as a form of anti-capitalist feminist health care hacking, predicated on the notion of open source data sharing as a form of genetic empowerment.


Thursday May 12, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

2:30pm

Teaching Foreign-Language and Cross-Cultural Digital Media
This proposal for a panel of four long papers stems from the ongoing discussion animated by the interdisciplinary group "Understanding Film and Media Cultures in a Digital World" (https://www.hastac.org/groups/understanding-film-and-media-cultures-digital-world). The group, created in September 2015 by a small network of HASTAC scholars and mentors based at Vanderbilt University and Queen’s University Belfast, explores issues related to digital pedagogy in these two, only apparently unrelated, disciplines: on the one hand, Foreign Languages; on the other, Media Studies.
While cultural globalization and digital technologies have had an enormous impact on every field in the Humanities, these two disciplines have seen their very objects of study and pedagogical contexts dramatically affected by these phenomena. Only a few years ago, students’ direct contact with foreign-language texts, cultural works and speakers/writers, as well as with global media would mostly take place within the classroom, the library, and other few, selected places. Nowadays, thanks to our networked laptops and smartphones, such contact is uninterrupted and omnipresent.
Teaching and learning cross-cultural and foreign-language media has thus to be conceptualized as a very different experience than in the recent past. The papers presented in this panel will explore this theme from different perspectives, trying to combine language-based and media-focused approaches. Hughes and Pagello will provide a general framework, building on linguistics and media theory, as well as on their different but finally not incomparable experiences of teaching Spanish in the American South, and teaching world cinema in Northern Ireland. Finch and Hagele will look at the uses of social media (respectively, Twitter and Instagram) in the foreign-language classroom. Ellis-Woods will reflect on the lessons to be learned from the history of the educational programming created by the BBC in the highly sensitive cross-cultural, multilingual environment of Northern Ireland.


Thursday May 12, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

4:00pm

Building the University Worth Fighting For: Tools for Pedagogical, Institutional, and Social Change
How does the development of technological tools and platforms relate to the mission of higher education as a public good? As digital technologies become increasingly integrated into our pedagogical practice, it is fundamental that we develop a critical framework for understanding the ethical and social implications of their use. While freely available “Web 2.0” technologies such as Twitter, Facebook, and Google Docs offer educators exciting opportunities to foster energetic forms of student collaboration, these tools deprive students of rights over their data and foster a passive, consumer-oriented relationship towards technology. Additionally, the inability to install open-source computational tools on university computers prevents students from exploring and understanding the computational methods that are becoming an ever greater force in everyday life. To counter these challenges, students and faculty at The CUNY Graduate Center have been developing new digital tools to bring computational methods and the affordances of “Web 2.0” into the classroom in an ethical, participatory, and accessible manner. Moderated by Katina Rogers, and featuring Digital Fellows and Futures Initiative Fellows from The CUNY Graduate Center, this interactive session will provide an overview of the differences between free and proprietary educational software and demo three tools currently in development at the Graduate Center: Social Paper, a non-proprietary socialized writing environment; DH Box, a cloud-based lab that enables classrooms to easily explore a range of computational tools without administrative privileges; and CBOX, an open-source, self-hosted social network. Session participants will be invited to interact with these tools during the panel, exploring ways to incorporate these resources into their own research and pedagogy.

This interactive session is part of the “University Worth Fighting For” #fight4edu series.


Thursday May 12, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88
 
Friday, May 13
 

10:30am

Wikipedia in the Classroom: A Window on Technical Communication Praxis
One of the challenges faced by new technical communication students is understanding the praxis of their new discipline. The work of technical communicators is both visual and textual, in and about technology, interdisciplinary and, in contrast to students’ common conception of writing, highly collaborative. The open-source online encyclopedia Wikipedia contains rich evidence of technical communication in action that expresses all of these qualities. In particular, Wikipedia’s Talk pages preserve the ongoing dialogue in which community members create knowledge and engage in meta-discourse on the production of digital, multimedia texts. This paper argues for the value of Talk pages for helping students understand the praxis of technical communication through two synergistic methods of analysis. In the first method, which draws on the work of Selfe and Selfe, students create a “text cloud” of Talk page text in order to locate the recurring concerns of technical communicators. In the second method students perform a close reading of Talk page text to uncover the complexities of how those concerns are expressed to accomplish a shared goal. This research provides benefits typically associated with job-shadowing, service learning, or client work. In particular, students can understand the role of technical communication in a community that is digital and worldwide, and which collectively maintains the world’s seventh most popular website.


Friday May 13, 2016 10:30am - 10:45am
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

10:45am

Constructing Community in Online Programs: A Digital Case Study
Nearly 25% of graduate students are in online programs, a number that is expected to grow by 20% over the next decade (Lederman, 2014; US Department of Education, 2011). Despite their rapid enrollment, online graduate programs have an attrition rate of between 30 and 70%. A sense of community is associated with retention in online programs (Liu, Gomez & Chrerng-Jyh, 2009). This exploratory case study draws on data collected from a cohort of 50 students spread across two online classes during their first semester of an online program to explore how students in online graduate programs construct community. Findings indicate that students and instructors used a variety of innovative practices to facilitate connection and support in the online space. Instructors’ were highly skilled with technology and used a variety of digital tools to foster collaborative learning, connection and community. Students also developed innovative practices to promote peer knowledge sharing and facilitate digital connections. The findings suggest that the proactive, technically savvy efforts of peers and instructors were instrumental in helping online students develop a sense of community.

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 10:45am - 11:00am
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

11:00am

Blended Stretch Writing at ASU
The Stretch Writing Program at Arizona State University (ASU) is a year-long, or stretched, version of traditional ENG101 aimed at helping students identified as academically at risk (the majority of whom are also members of at risk racial or economic groups). The program, which has been recognized both internally and nationally, is rooted in more than 20 years of research and practice, and has been extraordinarily successful in helping the at risk population succeed at the university. Starting in 2011, a small team of faculty in the College of Letters and Sciences (then the School of Letters and Sciences) at ASU’s Downtown Phoenix campus began to reimagine the Stretch Writing Program design for the 21st century by incorporating a wide array of digital technologies and pedagogical practices aimed at leveraging that technology to increase student engagement, digital literacies, and writing skills.

This new, blended version of the SWP, which we have called the “Stretch Writing Redesign” (SWR), was first deployed in fall 2012, and has been continually revised and updated since then. In the spring of 2014, SWR was recognized with the ASU Faculty Achievement Award in Curricular Innovation in recognition of both pedagogical innovation and positive early outcomes based on a review of a random and representative sampling of student work from before and after the redesign. In 2015, we were awarded a CCCCs “Research Initiative” grant to determine if (1) SWR represents a viable and measurable improvement of the SWP previously developed at ASU, (2) SWR successfully engages at risk students, and (3) SWR increase levels of engagement that would signal sustainable student success.

Our proposed “long paper” will present the data collected during the first year of the CCCC supported study, as well as (1) some early reflections on how the blended design of the SWR can enable student success in SWR classes, and (2) what it might tell us about the use of blended designs for other courses with at risk populations.


Friday May 13, 2016 11:00am - 11:15am
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

11:15am

Digital empathy-building pedagogies and cyberfeminism
Since Edward Snowden leaked classified documents about US surveillance, conversations of visibility in digital spaces and its ramifications have increased. But these ideas of surveillance and (in)visibility are not new to women who constantly live within the male gaze. Through examples of online harassment, such as #GamerGate, it has become abundantly clear that the Internet is a gendered space where women are not only more visible, but treated differently as well.

In this talk, we will examine the gendered nature of the Internet, and potential tools to build empathy and understanding. Intentional empathy building can work to change the gender imbalance in the tech, STEM, and media industries--the very heart of the knowledge economy. Particular focus will be given to ADAPT, a game developed by women to teach digital risk analysis, as a tool of empathy building and within empathy-building pedagogies.

Finally, we suggest that games such as ADAPT and other empathy-building pedagogies can be used to increase representation of marginalized groups and and greater recognition of issues related to marginalized groups in the pipeline for tech, STEM, and media industries. While this can best be done in higher education, such tools can be applied for younger audiences to develop digital skills and empathy at an earlier age.


Friday May 13, 2016 11:15am - 11:30am
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

11:45am

Makerspaces in libraries : exploring opportunities to expand the culture of makers and technologists
Libraries are inherently democratic institutions, striving to provide equal access to resources and services. From this position in our community, how can we change our services and approaches around digital humanities, makerspaces and innovation services to support a multicultural, diverse community? Specifically, how can we redesign our services to support more women and people of color in our communities.

The scope of the conversation could include, but is not limited to:
How can libraries (and their partners) help to increase opportunities for and exposure to emerging technology, “making” and digital scholarship for a diverse user base?
How are the designs of our spaces and/or services affecting the community we cultivate? How are they contributing to a narrow set of users?
What constitutes an inclusive maker community?
How does the start-up/entrepreneurship community exclude women and people of color?
How do we make “innovation” accessible to a diverse community?

Outcomes:
programming ideas
marketing/outreach strategies
considerations in partnerships and strategic initiatives
future research projects

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 11:45am - 12:45pm
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

1:00pm

The future of innovation: Transforming our society for saving lives
Mental health professionals (MHPs) tell us that sometimes community members contact them in cases of social media postings that raise concern of suicide so that the MHP can reach out to the individual at risk. Unfortunately, it is often the case that such posts do not receive any reply. The experience of failing to get a response after disclosing thoughts of suicide could exacerbate feelings of isolation and worthlessness, potentially increasing risk of suicide. This situation motivates the need for a safety net which could detect cases of public social media posts that indicate crisis to ensure that they do not go ignored. Previous work by De Choudhury (2013), Jashinsky (2013), and others has shown that machine learning methods can detect signals from social media that indicate depression and risk of suicide. ARKHumanity is new technology which targets the language of depressed individuals who express their thoughts and disappointments through the social network, Twitter. It searches and filters public tweets to identify language that leads to self-harm actions using a machine learning algorithm. This technology also has a front end graphical user interface that helps clinical psychologists, behavioral health experts, and trained volunteers to connect to those who are in crisis by sending them an appropriate reply with relevant resources. Currently there is no technology like this. This interactive presentation will share this new innovative technology, share the preliminary results of the usability study and begin the discussion on how innovation can transform our society to save lives.


Friday May 13, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

2:30pm

Fostering and Flourishing: Collaborative Digital Research & Teaching between Faculty and Undergraduates
Digital Humanities have expanded methods and forms for scholarship, increasing opportunities for participation and funding for those in the academy. While alt-ac (alternative academic) staff, faculty, and graduate student collaborations have been an oft-discussed topic in higher education journalism and at academic conferences, collaborations with undergraduate students have received less attention. This panel brings together faculty, academic staff, and undergraduate students from a range of disciplines (English, Education, Mathematics, Public Health) and institutions -- private, public, religious, and Hispanic Serving institutions -- to present short papers and facilitate a working session on faculty-student partnerships in research, pedagogy, and community-based activism. Panelists will explore the value of and obstacles to collaborative partnerships between faculty and undergraduates.
Anne Choi (CSU Dominguez Hills) will share a case study of a digital humanities project, "Recreating the Aloha Spirit", undertaken at a medium-sized state university, and the process by which students become experts through learning digital tools. Anne Cong-Huyen (Digital Scholar, Whittier College) and Sofia Duenas (Junior, Whittier College, HASTAC Scholar) will speak about their work in designing a new course that interrogates gender and race in digital labor, and incorporates digital assignments and activities to reinforce the content. Annemarie Perez (Loyola Marymount University) will discuss of the creation of a digital archive on The Chican@ Gothic. This public humanities project allows students to hone their digital writing skills while prompting conversations between the students authors and critics, both in person and via digital means. Lastly, Andrea Rehn (Whittier College) and Bill Kronholm (Whittier College) will speak about an experimental team-taught undergraduate project-based learning course titled “Just Hacking.” In this course, undergraduates with a wide variety of disciplinary backgrounds worked together on a project they titled “Operation F.I.S.H.” (food insecurity and stigmatized homelessness) that advanced from initial conception through prototype during a single semester.


Friday May 13, 2016 2:30pm - 3:45pm
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88

4:00pm

Opening up Embodied Pedagogy: Movement and Accessibility in the Classroom
Embodied pedagogy is not a phrase one hears often enough, but its basic principles are at the core of my teaching practice. You might have your own definition, but mine centers on putting the reality of the body back into the classroom, encouraging students to move around and to be IN their bodies even as they're in their minds and introducing movement, breathing, meditation, and power poses into the educational environment. In this workshop, I'll begin by explaining and demoing some of these techniques, from power poses to Samuel Delany's raised hand exercise, and give some examples of how they've positively affected my classroom's environment.

I'd like most of the session to be idea-sharing, though - what do YOU do in your classroom? How do you respect students' preferences, physical abilities, and/or range of motion while offering embodiment activities? What are some Universal Design embodiment activities that students of all (dis)abilities could benefit from?

Speakers

Friday May 13, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
COOR L1-88 975 S Myrtle Ave Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Session Location COOR L1-88